Neuroscience

Mar 19-20, 2014
1,178
18
72,633
 

BioConference Live makes it easier and more cost-effective for the neuroscience research community to come together online through live video webcasts and real-time networking. BioConference Live attendees learn new concepts, tools and techniques that they can apply to research and diagnosis. BioConference Live requires no travel or time away from the lab or hospital, yet delivers all the benefits of a physical conference. Attendees can earn free CME and CE Credits.

Learn about recent investments and the scientific foci of the BRAIN Initiative through a panel discussion with key leaders from different scientific and funding regulatory agencies. The BRAIN Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain.

Other topics will include: A panel discussion on Multiple Sclerosis, Neurologic Function and Dysfunction, Nervous System Development & Function, Neurologic Dysfunction from Molecular Mechanism to Human Diseases, Genetics of Neurologic Diseases and Epigenetic Regulation, Neurologic Diseases from Lab to Clinic including: Alzheimer?s, Parkinson?s, Huntington?s disease, ALS, traumatic brain & spinal cord injury, Epilepsy, neuropsychiatric disorders, Emerging Therapies including: immunomodulation, stem cells, non-coding RNA, neuroengineering, neurorobotics, myelin repair, combinatorial therapies, Imaging Technologies (in vitro and in vivo), Power of Methods including: diagnostic tests, biomarkers, tools to detect therapeutic responses, and Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience.

This event will bring together research scientists, post docs, principal investigators, lab directors and professionals from around the world to learn about recent advances in neuroscience. This conference offers an amazing opportunity as it is free to participants, and there will be no out-of-pocket expenses for travel. However, participants will still benefit from interacting with a global community of like-minded colleagues, without leaving the comfort of their office or home.


Conference participants will be able to

  • Attend interactive live streaming video sessions
  • Have their questions answered in real-time by industry experts
  • Chat live with peers and speakers
  • Browse a virtual exhibit floor for solution providers

No crowded airports, delayed flights or expensive hotel rooms, but still the look and feel of a first-rate conference with world renowned experts. Participants also benefit from the fact that experts and vendors are more accessible, no more waiting in line to speak to someone. Think it is too good to be true? Checkout the venue and become a believer.

Speakers

(See Agenda)
NIH Director's Pioneer Awardee, Professor of ...
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute ...
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute ...
Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease ...
Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology ...
Full professor Ecole doptomtrie, Universit de ...
Postdoctoral research scientist, UCLA
Director of the Brain Development Imaging Lab ...
Samuel & Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics ...
Director of Next-Gen Sequencing Laboratory ...
Assistant Professor Department of Physiology and ...
Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster ...
Professor Department of Biomedical and Molecular ...
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology ...
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.
Director Stem Cell Research Center & Core ...
Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia ...
Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington ...
Joint Professor at MIT, Synthetic Neurobiology ...
Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics, Professor ...
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.
Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Professor ...
Associate Chair, Department of Neuroscience ...
Associate Professor, Department of Biological ...
Head and Senior Scientist of Neurosciences & ...
Associate Professor Cain Denius Scholar in ...
Director of UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center, Director ...
Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology ...
Founder and Chief Science Officer, Cognition ...
Associate Professor at the Department of ...
Clinical Associate Professor Department of ...
Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening ...
Assistant Professor, University of Victoria ...
Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of the Social ...
Professor, Univ of Massachusettes Medical School ...

Neuroscience

Agenda

All times are Pacific Time

emerging therapies, technologies and methods -+

Mar 19, 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Therapeutic Strategies for Cognitive Dysfunction in Down Syndrome

Ahmad Salehi, MD, PhD

Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School

Down syndrome (DS) is a complex multi-system disorder affecting more than 5.8 million individuals around the world and it causes significant physical, psychological, and cognitive abnormalities in affected individuals. Later in adulthood, all individuals with DS develop brain pathology indistinguishable from that of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand the neurobiological basis of cognitive dysfunction in DS, we have used the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Similar to both DS and AD, these mice show significant age-dependent degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and norepinephrine (NE)-ergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Among around 300 genes triplicated in DS, the triplication of amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in DS. Interestingly, we found that App over-expression is both sufficient and necessary for degeneration of both cholinergic and NE-ergic systems. We have focused on restoring NE-ergic system as a therapeutic strategy for cognitive dysfunction in DS. The critical role of NE-ergic system in cognitive dysfunction in Ts65Dn has been supported by the fact that increasing brain NE levels with L-DOPS, i.e. a NE prodrug, restored contextual learning in Ts65Dn mice. L-DOPS was just approved by the FDA for use in the treatment of hypotension. To identify an alternative agent to improve NE signaling in DS and to expedite the process of drug development, we aimed to test the effects of adrenergic drugs on cognitive function that have already been approved for use in humans. In the periphery, a majority of β1ARs are found in the cardiovascular system. Formoterol is a long-acting adrenergic receptor agonist. We found that the use of formoterol in adult Ts65Dn mice was safe and led to a significant improvement in contextual learning and restoration of synaptic density in the dentate gyrus in Ts65Dn mice. Furthermore, formoterol treatment was linked to a significant increase in the rate of cell proliferation and dendritic complexity of newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in Ts65Dn mice. Our investigation revealed that improving β2 adrenergic signaling led to a significant increase in the density of microglia in the dentate gyrus of Ts65Dn mice. Since microglia activation has been linked to increased Aβ clearance, our data suggests that improving adrenergic signaling might also reduce the severity of Aβ pathology in adults DS showing significant AD-related pathology. All these data support the idea that improving NE-signaling particularity activation of β2 adrenergic receptors might be an effective strategy in improving cognitive function in both AD and DS.

Mar 19, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Chemogenetics: a transformational technology for neuroscience

Bryan L. Roth, MD, PhD

Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program, Michael Hooker Chair Protein Therapeutics , Professor of Pharmacology, UNC Chapel Hill Medical School Chapel Hill

Mar 19, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Engineering reproducible neural tissue from pluripotent stem cells

Stephanie Willerth, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Victoria Engineering, Canada

The Willerth lab investigates how to engineer neural tissue by combining pluripotent stem cells, controlled drug delivery and biomaterial scaffolds. When generating these replacement tissues, we use both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as these cells can become any cell type found in the body, including those cells found in the nervous system. Our recent projects have used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), which are adult cells reprogrammed back into an embryonic stem cell-like state, leading to the possibility of generating patient specific pluripotent stem cell lines with a reduced risk of immune rejection post transplantation. Recent work suggests that these hiPSC lines show a decreased risk of tumor formation compared to traditional embryonic stem cells, further enhancing their clinical relevance. To generate neural tissue, we seed these cells into different types of drug releasing scaffolds. These novel biomaterial scaffolds direct the stem cells to form functional neural tissue by delivering appropriate chemical and physical signals. Once we fully understand how to engineer neural tissue from stem cells, we can then apply these principles to produce other tissues found in the body.

neurological diseases from lab to clinic-+

Mar 20, 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Huntingtons Disease: Twenty years and counting

Margaret Sutherland, PhD

Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster, NIH/NINDS

Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, inherited, degenerative brain disorder that produces physical, mental and emotional changes. Named for George Huntington, the physician who first described the illness in 1872, Huntington's disease used to be known as Huntington's chorea, from the Greek for choreography, or dance. The name refers to the involuntary, jerky movements that can develop in later stages of the illness. In 1993, a consortium of scientists from six laboratories found the mutation, an expanded CAG repeat sequence, of 36 repeats or more, in exon 1 of the HTT gene on chromosome 4 that is responsible for Huntingtons disease. Since that seminal discovery many basic science advances have been made in understanding the pathways, proteins and DNA sequences that either the wild type and/or mutant protein impact. In fact, it is this plethora of possible targets that challenges current drug discovery efforts around small molecules or biologics that could either slow and/or stop the progression of this disease. This lecture will highlight unique aspects of Huntingtons disease basic, translational and clinical science that have contributed to our current knowledge of this disease and emphasize several key discoveries and technologies that are offering unique opportunities for future research and potential breakthroughs.

Mar 20, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

The potential of robotic technology as a next generation technology for neurological assessment

Stephen Scott, PhD

Professor Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queens University School of Medicine

Assessment of sensorimotor and cognitive function plays a crucial role in all facets of patient care, from diagnosing the specific disease or injury, to management and monitoring of rehabilitation strategies to ameliorate dysfunction. Most assessment scales for sensorimotor function are subjective in nature with relatively coarse rating systems, reflecting that it is difficult for even an experienced observer to discriminate small changes in performance using only the naked eye. Robotic technologies have had a profound impact in basic research to understand fundamental properties of sensorimotor control due to their ability to control the position or forces applied to the limb and their inherent ability to objectively quantify motor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for creating a new approach to neurological assessment. I will discuss a number of novel robot-based tasks weve developed to assess brain function in subjects with stroke, highlighting the complex patterns of sensory, motor and cognitive deficits that can be quantified with this technology.

Mar 20, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Neurogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease

Orly Lazarov, PhD

Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois College of Medicine

Neural stem cells exist in the adult mammalian brain throughout life. They reside in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone. Neural stem cells have the capability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia. The existence of neurogenesis permits high level of brain plasticity and provides a source for cellular replacement. Importantly, new neurons play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Thus, modulation of neurogenesis has a high therapeutic value, once the molecular signaling regulating these processes is unraveled. This might be particularly critical for aging-linked cognitive decline, such as occurs in Alzheimers disease. Neurogenesis is impaired early in life in Alzheimers mouse models, and major players in Alzheimers disease regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This lecture will discuss the molecular link between neurogenesis and Alzheimers disease and the ways by which impairments in neurogeneis may contribute to or exacerbate the disease. Finally, we will discuss neurogenesis-based therapy for the amelioration or attenuation of Alzheimers disease.

nervous system development & function-+

Mar 20, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Axonal Protein Synthesis in Neurodevelopment and -degeneration

Ulrich Hengst, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology , Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease, Columbia University

Spatially restricted protein synthesis is an important mechanism for the development and maintenance of many morphologically polarized cells including neurons. While most proteins are synthesized in the neuronal soma and transported into axons and dendrites, a comparably small subset of mRNAs is transported into the periphery of the neurons and only translated in response to specific signals. Work over the last two decades has established the existence of local protein synthesis in axons and provided insight into the differences between between dendritic and axonal translation. In this talk we will review the importance of local protein synthesis for the development, regeneration and maintenance of axons and address open questions such as the specific advantages of localized protein synthesis and its potential role in the mature or degenerating nervous system.

Mar 20, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Cholinergic modulation of visual perception in rodents

Elvire Vaucher, PhD

Full professor Ecole doptomtrie, Universit de Montral, Qubec, Canada

The cholinergic system is a potent neuromodulatory system which plays a critical role in cortical plasticity, attention and learning. The cholinergic activation of the cortex increases the signal-to-noise ratio, cue detection ability and the strength of the thalamocortical afferences relative to cortico-cortical signaling. These changes facilitate the treatment of a novel stimulus.
We are particularly interested in the role of the cholinergic system in visual processing and cortical plasticity of the visual cortex (V1). Our laboratory uses a large panel of techniques behaviour, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and optical imaging - to examine this issue from a cellular to an integrated and behavioural level. We have recently demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) was released in V1 during a pattern visual activation. The cholinergic deficit impaired the visually-induced neuronal activity in the layer 4 of V1 and the performance of the rat in a visual learning task. Moreover, deletion of different subtypes of muscarinic receptors in KO mice selectively altered the intrinsic organization of V1 suggesting a strong involvement of the muscarinic transmission in the detectability of visual stimuli. The transient coupling of cholinergic and pattern visual stimulation induced a long-term enhancement of the visual evoked potentials mediated by muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptors. This cholinergic-induced long-term modifications of the cortical functioning also improved visual perception. Activation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation over two weeks induced a long-term increase of visual evoked potentials in V1 and of the visual acuity of the rats.
Our results demonstrate that the pairing of the cholinergic system activation with visual training improved the visual performance of the animals and functional organization of V1. This study opens the possibility of boosting V1 plasticity and facilitating visual recovery.
Supported by CIHR, NSERC, FRQS Vision Research Network.

Mar 20, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Disinhibition Drives Rapid Movement and Associative Motor Memory Formation in the Cerebellum

Paul Mathews, PhD

Postdoctoral research scientist, UCLA

Motor coordination relies on accurate predictions that specify how the body should move in particular sensorimotor contexts. Although such predictions are thought to be stored as associative motor memories in the cerebellum, the circuit mechanisms by which they form and are acted upon remain unclear. Correlates of such memories, typically reductions in the firing rate of Purkinje neurons in advance of a learned movement, have been observed in the firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Given that Purkinje neurons powerfully inhibit deep cerebellar nuclei neurons, and that some deep cerebellar nuclei neurons project directly to motor nuclei like the red nucleus, pauses in spontaneous Purkinje neuron firing have the potential to drive motor output. However, it is unclear whether reductions in Purkinje neuron firing alone are sufficient to drive movement, and if so whether their ability to drive movement depends upon prior learning. To examine these questions we have utilized an approach to selectively manipulate Purkinje neuron firing activity in an awake, behaving animal while simultaneously monitoring cellular activity or motor movement. Together, the results I will present indicate movements driven by Purkinje neuron pauses are influenced by whether or not learning has occurred, and support the hypothesis that during learning Purkinje neuron activity instructs memory-related changes in the deep cerebellar nucleus.

behavioral and cognitive neuroscience-+

Mar 19, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

How Subtle and "Benevolent" Biases Undermine Women's Advancement in the Sciences

Peter Glick, PhD

Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of the Social Sciences, Professor of Psychology, Lawrence University

Discrimination against women has typically been attributed to hostile and demeaning stereotypes about womens capabilities. However, a growing body of evidence shows that subjectively positive, but patronizing views undermine and sabotage women in traditionally masculine occupations, including STEM fields. Specifically, benevolent sexism the belief that women are wonderful but fragile, and require mens protection and assistance limits womens opportunities, leads to soft and uninformative feedback, and undermines womens performance by creating intrusive thoughts that interfere with executive functioning. Relatedly, subjectively positive, but prescriptive stereotypes that women should be warmer than men create backlash when women assert themselves (e.g., promote their work). Because benevolently, as compared to hostile, sexist attitudes are more widely accepted and (falsely) viewed as harmless, women as well as men often endorse benevolently sexist views. Women who internalize benevolent sexism show less ambitious educational and occupational aspirations, increased concern that career success will interfere with heterosexual romance, and greater tolerance for gender inequality. The first step in combating these problems is to recognize that benevolent sexism has nontrivial and insidious effects on female scientists. Organizations that train and employ science can systematically reduce bias and increase womens success by attending to and modifying subtle cues that signal to women that they dont belong. Organizations can also promote wise mentoring, which involves: (a) believing and communicating that scientific talent develops through training (is not fixed and unchanging), (b) combining critical feedback using high standards with (c) messages that the mentee belongs, has promise, and is being given the feedback to accelerate her or his development.

Mar 20, 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

Biomarkers, Cognition and Cognitive Reserve in Alzheimers Disease

Prashanthi Vemuri, PhD

Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic

Late onset dementia is usually a multi-factorial disease wherein cumulative pathological brain insults (of more than one pathology) results in progressive cognitive decline which ultimately leads to impairment in ones ability to function at work and/or perform usual activities/tasks. Until recently, postmortem examination has been the only way to accurately determine the underlying pathology that led to dementia. However with the recent emergence of advanced imaging technologies, imaging indicators of disease that closely reflect the underlying pathology have been found to be very useful in aiding the prediction of the underlying dementia pathology.
In the first part of the talk, we will discuss how different biomarkers could be used to measure different aspects of Alzheimers disease (AD) pathology, a leading cause of dementia and how they can aid in answering several important questions about the disease processes. In the second part of the talk, we will talk about the concept of cognitive reserve (CR) and how it may aid in delaying the onset of dementia. CR is the term often used to explain why about 30% of cognitively normal subjects with AD pathology do not show any cognitive symptoms. Our recent studies have shown that even though CR does not appear to impact the degree of pathological deposition in the brain but it has an independent effect on cognitive performance wherein subjects with higher reserve have a greater capacity to cope with pathological insults and these individual differences in reserve mechanisms help explain why cognitive decline may be initiated at different times in relation to the onset of pathology.

Learning Objectives:
1) Discuss how the role of biomarkers in Alzheimers disease
2) Describe the concept of cognitive reserve and explain the mechanisms through which it delays the onset of Alzheimers disease

Mar 20, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Neuroimaging Informatics: Distributed Resources for 'Big' Cognition

David N. Kennedy, PhD

Professor, Univ of Massachusettes Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Director of the Division of Neuroinformatics at the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative

Neuroimaging plays a large role in our pursuit of the understanding of behavior and cognition in health and disease. The past decade has seen the emergence of a wealth of resources that support this pursuit. The increasing complexity of this landscape of resources necessitates the development of resource management systems to support researchers in navigating this big data environment.

The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) is a neuroimaging informatics knowledge environment for structural and functional imaging, clinical neuroinformatics, genomics and computational neuroscience. Initiated in 2006 through the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NITRCs mission is to foster a user-friendly knowledge environment for the neuroinformatics community.

NITRC is comprised of three integrated services. The NITRC-Resources website (nitrc.org) facilitates the finding of software and data. To support the need for expanded data hosting, the NITRC Image Registry (NITRC-IR) provides a data sharing solution. Once a user finds software and data, local processing is likely to become rate limiting as the magnitude of the shared datasets gets larger. This prompted the development of the NITRC Computational Environment (NITRC-CE), a cloud-based, high-performance, computational platform tailored to the needs of the NITRC community.

In this presentation, we will review the general functionality of the NITRC suite of services and explore the applications of these tools to example cognitive and behavioral questions as supported by various neuroimaging initiatives. Integrating data from the '1000 Functional Connectomes' project, the Autism Brain Image Data Exchange (ABIDE), the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) and the Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition and Genetics (PING) projects, as examples, will highlight the utility of these approaches in integrating many disparate information sources in support of a unified analytic strategy.

brain initiative -+

Mar 19, 6:00 AM - 7:00 AM PT

The Novel Neurotechnology: implications for science, medicine and society

Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD

NIH Director's Pioneer Awardee, Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience, Columbia University, Co-director of the Kavli Foundations Institute for Neural Circuitry

In physical systems built with many components, emergent properties, such as magnetism, are often generated from the interactions among these particles. These emergent properties are often invisible when observing individual particles, since they depend on large-scale interactions between them. Likewise, the function of neural circuits has been mostly studied by examining the responses of individual neuron, yet it is probably an emergent property that arises from the coordinated activity of large numbers of neurons.
To capture this emergent level of brain function, we proposed to launch a large-scale, international public project, the Brain Activity Map Project (which has become the BRAIN Initiative), aimed at developing new methods to measure and control neural activity across complete neural circuits in experimental animals and human patients. This technological effort will be an interdisciplinary project, incorporating into neuroscience many methods and approaches from the physical sciences and nanotechnologies.
The data obtained with these new methodscould prove to be an invaluable step towards understanding fundamental and pathological brain processes.

Mar 19, 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science overview

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies
(BRAIN) Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at
revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. By accelerating
the development and application of innovative technologies, researchers
will be able to produce a revolutionary new dynamic picture of the brain
that, for the first time, shows how individual cells and complex neural
circuits interact in both time and space. Long desired by researchers
seeking new ways to treat, cure, and even prevent brain disorders, this
picture will fill major gaps in our current knowledge and provide
unprecedented opportunities for exploring exactly how the brain enables
the human body to record, process, utilize, store, and retrieve vast
quantities of information, all at the speed of thought. (NIH website)
The NIH Directors working group identified circuit-level analysis of
the nervous system as the primary research goal of the NIH BRAIN
Initiative, mapping the circuits of the brain, measuring their activity
patterns within the circuits and understanding how their interplay
creates unique cognitive and behavioral capabilities.
In the presentation format the invited distinguished speakers and
panelists will give an overview of the BRAIN Initiative, its research
goals and challenges to achieve them. In president Obamas words this is
one of the Grand Challenges of the 21st century. Presentations will be
followed by interactive moderated panel discussions.

Mar 19, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Brain Computer Interfaces: Neurotech in the Future of Neuroscience

Lana Morrow, PhD

Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

When speaking of neurodegenerative diseases, average public is not made aware of the true cost that brain related disorders have on annual budget. The true impact on economy is not usually the direct cost of healthcare, but rather, loss of daily productivity, of not only the primary person affected, but also of the caretakers and family. Primary caretaker functions like a manager for the case. He or she loses days of work because of caretakers needs and involvement. Secondary impact on the case is anxiety and depression ensuing the illness, not only present in the primary patient, but also in family members. This further decreases productivity on the global scale. Thomas Insel, the director of NIMH suggested
three approaches to estimate global economic burden: (a) a standard cost of illness method, (b) macroeconomic simulation, and (c) the value of a statistical life. The results of all three methods project staggering costs over the next two decades, with cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental health representing a cumulative output loss of $47 Trillions, roughly 75% of the global GDP in 2010. Over 2 billion people suffer from brain-based related productivity loss, which translates into a 2 trillion economic burden. One approach is to find innovative ways to prevent and treat diseases in a more economically feasible ways: neurotechnology and biotechnology of healthcare.

Mar 20, 6:00 AM - 7:00 AM PT

Connectomics - Defining Neural Circuits to Understand Brain Function

Scott W. Emmons, PhD

Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics, Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Connectomics is a new field of research that aims to map the synapses of the nervous system in order to construct a wiring diagram of all the neural circuits. It is necessary to use the electron microscope to visualize synapses, so at present the connectomes of most animal species cannot be determined. Currently, the only known connectome is that of the tiny nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans is an excellent model for understanding how the nervous system controls behavior. The wiring diagram of the C. elegans nervous system represents a neural network. Many of the features of this network help us understand how animal nervous systems function.

Learning objectives:
1. Connectomics is a new field of study that aims to identify the circuits of the nervous system.
2. The connectome of the nematode worm C. elegans, which is the only currently known complete wiring diagram of an animal nervous system, is a neural network with features that help explain its function.

Mar 20, 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Tools for Mapping Brain Computations

Edward S. Boyden, PhD

Joint Professor at MIT, Synthetic Neurobiology Research Group, AT&T Career Development Associate Professor, MIT

The brain is a complex, densely wired circuit made out of heterogeneous cells, which vary in their shapes, molecular composition, and patterns of connectivity. In order to help discover how neural circuits implement brain functions, and how these computations go awry in brain disorders, we invent technologies to enable the scalable, systematic observation and control of biological structures and processes in the living brain. We have developed genetically-encoded reagents that, when expressed in specific neuron types in the nervous system, enable their electrical activities to be precisely driven or silenced in response to millisecond timescale pulses of light. I will give an overview of these "optogenetic"
tools, adapted from natural photosensory and photosynthetic proteins, and discuss new tools we are developing, including molecules with novel color sensitivities (e.g., Chrimson, Jaws) and other unique capabilities (e.g., Chronos). We are also developing optogenetic tools that enable activation of endogenous protein and signaling pathways (e.g., lumitoxins). Often working in interdisciplinary collaborations, we have developed microfabricated hardware to enable complex and distributed neural circuits to be controlled and observed in a fully 3-D fashion, as well as robots that can automatically record neurons intracellularly and integratively in live brain, and strategies for building 3-D brain circuits in vitro. These tools are in widespread use to enable systematic analysis of neural circuit functions, are also opening up new frontiers on the understanding and treatment of brain disorders, and may serve as components of new platforms for diagnosing and treating brain disease

Mar 20, 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

The Human Connectome Project

David Van Essen, PhD

Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Mar 20, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science and funding overview

Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield

Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF

emerging therapies, technologies and methods -+

Mar 20, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Neuroeconomy; Economic Impact of Neurodegenerative Diseases both in the US and Globally

Lana Morrow, PhD

Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

When speaking of neurodegenerative diseases, average public is not made aware of the true cost that brain related disorders have on annual budget. The true impact on economy is not usually the direct cost of healthcare, but rather, loss of daily productivity, of not only the primary person affected, but also of the caretakers and family. Primary caretaker functions like a manager for the case. He or she loses days of work because of caretakers needs and involvement. Secondary impact on the case is anxiety and depression ensuing the illness, not only present in the primary patient, but also in family members. This further decreases productivity on the global scale. Thomas Insel, the director of NIMH suggested
three approaches to estimate global economic burden: (a) a standard cost of illness method, (b) macroeconomic simulation, and (c) the value of a statistical life. The results of all three methods project staggering costs over the next two decades, with cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental health representing a cumulative output loss of $47 Trillions, roughly 75% of the global GDP in 2010. Over 2 billion people suffer from brain-based related productivity loss, which translates into a 2 trillion economic burden. One approach is to find innovative ways to prevent and treat diseases in a more economically feasible ways: neurotechnology and biotechnology of healthcare.

Mar 20, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Cross-talk & Developmental Programs A Key to Translational Stem Cell Biology

Evan W. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.P

Director Stem Cell Research Center & Core Facility, Professor, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Inst, Faculty Physician, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego

The therapeutic utility of stem cells is rooted in an understanding -- and exploitation -- of their natural role from earliest development to lifes end. Their job is first to participate in organogenesis and then to maintain homeostasis of that organ (e.g., the nervous system) in the face of perturbations. Accomplishment of these goals requires numerous actions, cell replacement representing but one. The tasks, in fact, require extensive cross-talk between multiple cell types (including stem cell-derived progeny themselves) and the unfolding of complex developmental programs. This complexity actually enriches the therapeutic potential of the stem cell.
We study the behavior of neural stem cells (NSCs) in various models of injury and degeneration. During neurodegeneration and inflammation, factors are transiently elaborated which draw NSCs (even over great distances) to engage the niche and attempt restoration of equipoise by a variety of mechanisms. These actions include differentiating towards the replacement of impaired neural cells, both neurons and non-neuronal chaperone cells, all of which are essential for restitution of function. NSCs elaborate factors that promote neuroprotection, trophic support, differentiation, neuritogenesis, connectivity, angiogenesis, inhibition of inflammation and scarring. In addition to producing diffusible factors, NSCs communicate via gap junctions to re-equilibrate the intracellular metabolism of endangered neurons. NSCs may serve as vehicles for protein delivery enabling simultaneous cell and gene therapy. NSCs synergize with biomaterials to "re-engineer" damaged regions. Multimodal approaches are likely required for most neurological conditions; NSCs may serve as the glue. When studied in vitro (development- or disease-in-a-dish), NSCs may help identify novel mechanisms, drug targets, and the drugs themselves.
While repair may entail recapitulating developmental programs, pathology (e.g., cancer) may represent the perversion of such programs. Thwarting such pathology, may involve the pharmacological re-establishment of the proper program.
These various themes will be discussed.

keynote-+

Mar 19, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PT

When good neurons go bad: Dopamine neuron regulation and its disruption in schizophrenia and depression

Anthony Grace, PhD

Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh

Mar 20, 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PT

Using brain imaging and biomarkers for diagnosis and investigation of Alzheimer's disease "The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiat

Michael Weiner, MD

Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease, Neuroimaging Initiative, Professor in Residence, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder producing cognitive impairment and dementia in millions of elders. Currently no treatment is effective to slow the progression of AD. Major obstacles to developing effective treatments are: 1) a reliance on clinical symptoms and a lack of biomarkers for diagnosis 2) uncertainty concerning which biomarkers are best to identify disease stage and to predict progression 3) lack of standardization and 4) absence of naturalistic data to provide a basis for clinical trial design, problem in the field. To address these issues ADNI was funded for a total of $140 million, as a public/private partnership between the National Institute of Aging and a consortium of pharmaceutical companies (including Swiss companies). The goal of ADNI (from 2004-present see ADNI-info.org) has been to standardize and determine the value of MRI and PET imaging together with blood and CSF biomarkers for disease modifying Alzheimers treatment trials. In our initial project (ADNI1), we longitudinally studied: MCI (n= 400); AD (n= 200); Controls (n= 220) with clinical visits, neuropsychological assessments, MRI (1.5 T), FDG PET, blood and urine, and CSF. About 300 subjects from ADNI 1 continue to be followed. We found that the rate of hippocampal atrophy had high statistical power for measuring change over time. Normal healthy elders with APOE4 and/or low CSF Aβ amyloid have worse memory scores and higher rates of hippocampal atrophy, consistent with the view that about 30% of healthy elders in their 70s have preclinical AD pathology. Similar ADNI-like projects, with similar methods, are underway in Australia, Japan, Europe, China, Taiwan, and Korea leading to the World Wide ADNI network. The Parkinsons Progressive Markers Initiative (PPMI) has been modeled after ADNI. ADNI 2 with 3Tesla MRI and F18 amyloid PET imaging with Florbetapir on an additional 150 controls, 100 normal subjects with cognitive complaints, 300 subjects with early MCI, 150 subjects with late MCI , 150 subjects with dementia due to AD. Thus a total of about 1700 subjects have been enrolled and are followed longitudinally. Whole genome sequencing on 800 subjects is available. All ADNI data is available to all scientists in the world, on USC/LONI/ADNI, without embargo. Blood and CSF samples can be requested. ADNI methods are now widely used in clinical treatment trials, and have led to the development of the new research criteria. Over 600 papers have been written on ADNI data and all scientists are encouraged to explore this rich data set and publish their results. It is expected that ADNI will substantially contribute to identifying accurate diagnostic techniques and effective treatments to slow the progression and prevent Alzheimers disease.

nervous system development & function-+

Mar 19, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Age-Dependent Responses of Dendrite Structure to Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity

Kristen Harris, PhD

Associate Chair, Department of Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience , Fellow Center for Learning and Memory, University of Texas at Austin

Dendritic spine shape enables sequestering of subcellular components needed for synaptic plasticity, including polyribosomes for local protein synthesis, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) to regulate calcium and glutamate receptor trafficking, endosomes for redistribution of proteins and membrane, and the Golgi-like spine apparatus. In hippocampus and elsewhere, synapse size correlates with presynaptic vesicle numbers, which are greater in the presence of sparsely distributed mitochondria and perisynaptic astroglial processes. Diversity in composition signifies synapse-specific structural plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning well-suited to the investigation of structural synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal LTP in the rat has an abrupt onset at postnatal day 12 (P12) that is associated with the first occurrence of dendritic spines. In mature hippocampus, LTP results in loss of small dendritic spines with compensatory enlargement of remaining spine synapses, leading to a balanced sum total of synaptic surface area per dendritic segment (i.e. structural synaptic scaling). This structural scaling occurs as presynaptic vesicles are recruited to vesicle free zones, with pre-existing postsynaptic densities at the edges of synapses, thereby enlarging the synaptic active zone of potentiated synapses. A similar form of scaling occurs in the mature dentate gyrus in vivo, where dendritic spines and synapses enlarge with LTP in the middle molecular layer, but shrink in the inner and outer molecular layers that have concurrent long-term depression. At P15, LTP results in more dendritic spines without compensatory scaling in synapse size. Polyribosomes show differential dynamics at both young and mature ages depending on whether LTP was induced by tetanic or theta-burst stimulation. At P15, endosomes are rapidly recruited to enlarge spines. At immature and adult ages, the dendritic shaft contains SER that forms bridges where glutamate receptor trafficking is slowed in regions of high spine density. The SER becomes more tubular during LTP, a configuration that facilitates glutamate receptor trafficking. At both immature and adult ages, presynaptic vesicle counts are reduced with LTP, a phenomenon related to the presence of presynaptic recycling endosomes and mitochondria. In contrast to LTP, the response of mature dendrites to blocked synaptic transmission involves proliferation of spines, which does not occur on immature dendrites until after postnatal day 21. Thus, hippocampal synapses have unequal and sometimes opposite responses to plasticity-inducing activity depending on age and paradigm.

Mar 19, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Src Regulation of Lamellipodia, Filopodia, and Substrate-Cytoskeletal Coupling in Neuronal Growth Cones

Daniel Suter, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University

Axonal growth and pathfinding is fundamental to the development and regeneration of the nervous system. Src tyrosine kinase has been implicated in this process; however, the detailed molecular and cellular mechanisms involving Src regulation of neuronal growth cone motility are not fully understood. We have focused on two potential roles of Src: (1) control of coupling between cell adhesion receptors and the underlying actin cytoskeleton and (2) regulation of actin dynamics and organization in lamellipodia and filopodia. Src2 and the Src substrate and actin binding protein cortactin accumulate at adhesion sites induced by the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule apCAM. Tension application increases Src2 activation state, while Src inhibition uncouples apCAM from actin flow. Expression of constitutively active (CA) Src2 increases density and lateral movements of filopodia in Aplysia growth cones, while the expression of dominant negative (DN) Src2 or cortactin phosphorylation mutants have opposite effects, suggesting a positive role of Src2 and cortactin in filopodia formation and integration within the lamellipodial actin network. On the other hand, analysis of filopodial actin dynamics suggests only a minor role for Src2 and cortactin in regulating actin assembly during filopodial extension. CA Src2- and cortactin-expressing growth cones have wider lamellipodia and spend more time in leading edge protrusion compared with control growth cones, suggesting that Src2 activity enhances actin assembly in growth cone lamellipodia. In summary, our results indicate that Src2/cortactin regulate lamellipodia protrusion and filopodia formation in neuronal growth cones as well as force transduction at apCAM adhesion sites.

neurological diseases from lab to clinic-+

Mar 19, 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

A Unique B Cell Derived Signature of Multiple Sclerosis and its Biologic Implications

Benjamin Greenberg, MD

Associate Professor Cain Denius Scholar in Mobility Disorders, Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that leads to widespread pathology within the central nervous system (CNS) and is the most common cause of neurologic disability among young adults within the US. Pathologic descriptions of multiples sclerosis have documented damage to the myelin sheath around axons and to underlying neurons. The mechanism of damage has long been ascribed to auto reactive T cells that infiltrate the CNS and cause tissue injury. Over the last decade, however, a significant amount of data has implicated a deranged B cell biology in the pathogenesis of this disabling condition. Work completed within labs at UT Southwestern have identified a novel pattern of somatic hypermutation among B cells from MS patients. This pattern is currently being studied as a potential new biomarker or diagnostic test for the condition. Continued research has begun to determine the antigenic targets of this deranged B cell biology and will point the field in new research directions. This presentation will present data relative to the identified pattern of somatic hypermutation from MS patients, the biology of the produced antibodies from these unique cells and implications for future research.

Mar 19, 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Remyelinating the adult central nervous system: Repairing injury in MS

Ari Green, MD

Director of UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center, Director of UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center, Rachleff Endowed Professor, Associate Professor of Neurology and Opthalmology, UCSF School of Medicine

Multiple Sclerosis is a debilitating neurodegnerative disease of the central nervous system in which the immune system targets and destroys myelin sheaths surrounding axons. Progressive and permanent neurological disability in the disease is caused by the ultimate loss of the underlying axons themselves. Nearly a dozen FDA-approved therapies exist to help reduce the inflammation that contributes to immune mediated injury or prevent the influx of immune cells from peripheral circulation into the CNS. However, to date there are no therapies capable of protecting axon loss and/or regenerating lost myelin. There are compelling reasons to think that maintenance or restoration of myelin integrity would help with protection of axons from loss and injury. Myelin in the CNS is an extension of the plasma membrane from mature oligodendrocytes - a specialized cell type whose principal purpose is to provide the myelin needed to ensheath axons. The precursor cell for oligodendrocytes known as OPCs are tiled throughout the CNS, but they don't appear to adequately differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes capable of restoring myelination to denuded axons. This talk will discuss the use of a novel high throughput screen for the identification of small molecules with the capacity to induce oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin wrapping. It will also discuss the validation of the "hits" from this screening assay and the rapid introduction of these therapeutic targets to patients including the selection of targets focusing on mechanism of action and BBB penetration. This will include discussion of the importance of development of clinical trial outcomes for the advancement of successful therapeutic programs in neuroprotection.

Mar 19, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

MS Bioscreen: From the Bedside to the Bench and Back

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, PhD, MPH

Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

We present a personalized medicine suite of software applications developed at UCSF for multiple sclerosis (MS): the MS Bioscreen. This new tool addresses the challenges of the dynamic management of complex chronic diseases such as MS; the interaction of physicians and patients with such a tool illustrates the extent to which translational digital medicine i.e. the application of information technology to medicinehas the potential to radically transform medical practice. It integrates clinical data including MRI brain imaging and research data with immunological and genetic biomarkers such as SNPs associated with MS risk and HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. With the development of the MS Bioscreen we introduce three key evolutionary phases in displaying the data to health care providers, patients, and researchers: visualization (accessing data), contextualization (understanding the data), and actionable interpretation (real-time use of the data to support decision-making). Together these features form the stepping-stones that are expected to accelerate standardization of data across platforms, promote evidence-based medicine, and lead to improved patient outcomes.

Mar 19, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Abeta oligomer receptor antagonists as disease-modifying Alzheimers therapeutics

Susan Catalano, PhD

Founder and Chief Science Officer, Cognition Therapeutics, Inc.

Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic Amyloid beta (Abeta)1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimers disease (AD). Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins are reported to inhibit synaptic plasticity mechanisms such as long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in hippocampal neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance. We have discovered small molecules with high affinity for Abeta oligomer receptors that displace Abeta oligomer binding in vitro and in human AD patient brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner, and both prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking, synapse loss and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. Our evidence suggests that despite structural heterogeneity, Abeta oligomers bind saturably and reversibly to specific receptors at synapses, and that the Abeta oligomer-induced synaptotoxicity underlying Alzheimers disease has a pharmacological basis that is amenable to treatment with small molecules. The compounds we have discovered therefore represent promising Alzheimers disease-modifying therapeutic drug candidates.

Mar 19, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

ABCA1 and APOE: Intertwined roles in Alzheimers disease

Radosveta Koldamova, MD, PhD

Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh

ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux to lipid-free apolipoproteins such as apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein E (apoE). ABCA1 is essential regulator of high density lipoprotein generation (HDL) a role that defines its significance for cardiovascular disease. ABCA1 and APOE are transcriptionally regulated by Liver X Receptors (LXR) and Retinoic X Receptors (RXR).
The inheritance of 4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimers disease (AD). Patients carrying APOE4 allele, compared to those with the other two isoforms, have more amyloid plaques a finding replicated in human Amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. Recent data suggest that ABCA1 via its control over apoE lipidation may have a role in AD. Studies from our and other groups have demonstrated that lack of ABCA1 increases amyloid deposition and cognitive decline in different AD model mice accompanied by significant decrease in the levels of apoE and apoA-I. In contrast, treatment with LXR or RXR ligands increases ABCA1 and apoE levels and significantly ameliorates amyloid pathology. In a recent study using APP mice we demonstrated that ABCA1 haplo deficiency had a differential effect on the phenotype of APOE3 or APOE4 expressing mice. The lack of one copy of Abca1 significantly aggravated memory deficits, Aβ plaques and Aβ clearance in APP/APOE4 but not in APP/APOE3 mice. Interestingly, we found a correlation between HDL in plasma and amyloid load in brain, suggesting a causative connection between peripheral lipoproteins and Aβ load in the CNS.
In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that future therapies targeting ABCA1 and APOE expression such as LXR/RXR agonists could have a favorable effect on the outcome in AD patients including APO4 carriers.

neurological dysfunction from genes to human disease-+

Mar 19, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

NMDA receptor regulation in health and disease

Michael Salter, MD, PhD, FRSC

Head and Senior Scientist of Neurosciences & Mental Health, Associate Chief of Science Strategy Research, Sick Kids Research Institute

Neuron-glial interactions are increasingly recognized as being key for physiological and pathological processes in the central nervous system. Microglia have been found to play a causal role in neuropathic pain behaviours resulting from peripheral nerve injury, and a core neuron-microglia-neuron signaling pathway has been elucidated. Within the dorsal horn, microglia suppress neuronal inhibition by a cascade involving activation of microglial P2X4 receptors causing the release of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF acts on trkB receptors which leads to a rise in intracellular chloride concentration in dorsal horn nociceptive output neurons, transforming the response properties of these neurons. In addition to suppressing inhibition, peripheral nerve injury causes activity-dependent facilitation at dorsal horn glutamatergic synapses which enhances nociceptive transmission. This enhancement is mediated by intracellular signaling networks involving serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases within nociceptive transmission neurons. Key for this enhancement is facilitation of NMDA receptor function by Src family tyrosine kinases. Microglia-to-neuron signaling is not only critical for pain hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury but also for the paradoxical hyperalgesic effect of morphine and other opioids. We anticipate that by targeting microglia-neuron signaling pathways new therapeutic strategies for chronic pain as well as its comorbid sequelae may be developed.

Mar 20, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Impairments of brain network connectivity in autism

Ralph-Axel Mueller, PhD

Director of the Brain Development Imaging Lab, Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University

With a rising prevalence recently exceeding 1%, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has become a pressing public health issue. Crucial hurdles on the way to targeted treatments are (i) the reliance on behavioral diagnostic criteria for disorder known to be neurological in nature, and (ii) the lack of knowledge about biologically defined subtypes that may be linked to identifiable sets of genetic (and environmental) risk factors. Despite a plethora of neuroscientific findings, fully sensitive and specific brain biomarkers have not been identified. However, there are strong indications from genetics, postmortem literature, and neuroimaging supporting the investigation of brain network connectivity as a promising source of the needed biomarkers. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has been one widely applied method, but with a recently grown awareness of methodological issues, the initial model of general underconnectivity has to be revised in favor of concepts such as impaired network integration and differentiation in ASD. Anatomical connectivity has been primarily studied with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), with findings supporting atypical age-related changes in tract maturation and organization as well as widespread white matter compromise in adolescents and adults with ASD. Multimodal imaging approaches will be crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of network abnormalities in ASD, but findings from fcMRI and DTI reflect different parameters of connectivity and do not always coincide. The mandate of hypothesis-driven investigation may create as much harm as good in the specific case of ASD research, as data-mining techniques (such as machine learning diagnostic classification) may be uniquely suited to uncover complex patterns of biomarkers.

Mar 20, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

The Genetics of Alzheimer's disease

Alison Goate, D.Phil

Samuel & Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Neurology, Dept. of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine

Alzheimers disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progress decline in memory and thinking and pathologically by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The strongest risk factors for AD are age family history. Early genetic studies of AD focused on families where the disease exhibited an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Genetic studies in these families identified mutations in three genes that generally cause an early onset form of the disease. These genes pointed to the amyloid peptide, which is the primary component of the senile plaques as central to disease pathogenesis. Subsequent studies in the late onset form of the disease using genome-wide approaches to study both common and rare genetic variation have identified evidence for many more genes that can influence risk for AD. These studies have uncovered other pathways including innate immunity and lipid metabolism that also play key roles in disease risk and point to potential therapeutic targets for treatment of disease.

Mar 20, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

The role of high throughput sequencing in the research and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders

Peter L Nagy, MD, PhD

Director of Next-Gen Sequencing Laboratory Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine, Associate Professor, Columbia University

Using high throughput next-generation sequencing to simultaneously search large number of genes for pathogenic mutations has numerous advantages. It decreases the pressure to narrow the differential diagnosis for diseases with overlapping phenotypes, can identify entirely new causative private mutations when no good candidate genes are available, and shorten the patients diagnostic odyssey. The Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine at Columbia University started offering mitochondrial genome, partial and whole exome sequencing for clinical diagnostic purposes in January 2013. In my talk I will highlight the effectiveness of next-gen sequencing in diagnosing neurological and neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore I will discuss the use of next-gen sequencing technologies to evaluate transcriptional and translational changes that might define these conditions in cell culture and animal model systems. Finally, I will propose some practical steps that would improve the effectiveness of next-gen sequencing diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders and present my view of the near future based on the technologies that are available or will soon become available.

Mar 20, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Genetics of Parkinsons disease

Katerina Venderova, PhD

Assistant Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of the Pacific, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Parkinsons disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Over the past few years, studies have identified a number of genes that cause or contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder. Pathophysiologically, Parkinsons disease is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons, a process that to this date cannot be effectively stopped or slowed down by any available pharmacological treatment. A systematic analysis of genes and genetic networks involved in this neurodegenerative process is uncovering new molecular pathways with the hope of identifying potential new pharmacological targets for a disease-modifying treatment of Parkinsons disease. The goal of this presentation is to highlight some of these genes and pathways

Emerging Therapies, Technologies and Methods

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Therapeutic Strategies for Cognitive Dysfunction in Down Syndrome

Ahmad Salehi, MD, PhD

Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School

Down syndrome (DS) is a complex multi-system disorder affecting more than 5.8 million individuals around the world and it causes significant physical, psychological, and cognitive abnormalities in affected individuals. Later in adulthood, all individuals with DS develop brain pathology indistinguishable from that of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand the neurobiological basis of cognitive dysfunction in DS, we have used the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Similar to both DS and AD, these mice show significant age-dependent degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and norepinephrine (NE)-ergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Among around 300 genes triplicated in DS, the triplication of amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in DS. Interestingly, we found that App over-expression is both sufficient and necessary for degeneration of both cholinergic and NE-ergic systems. We have focused on restoring NE-ergic system as a therapeutic strategy for cognitive dysfunction in DS. The critical role of NE-ergic system in cognitive dysfunction in Ts65Dn has been supported by the fact that increasing brain NE levels with L-DOPS, i.e. a NE prodrug, restored contextual learning in Ts65Dn mice. L-DOPS was just approved by the FDA for use in the treatment of hypotension. To identify an alternative agent to improve NE signaling in DS and to expedite the process of drug development, we aimed to test the effects of adrenergic drugs on cognitive function that have already been approved for use in humans. In the periphery, a majority of β1ARs are found in the cardiovascular system. Formoterol is a long-acting adrenergic receptor agonist. We found that the use of formoterol in adult Ts65Dn mice was safe and led to a significant improvement in contextual learning and restoration of synaptic density in the dentate gyrus in Ts65Dn mice. Furthermore, formoterol treatment was linked to a significant increase in the rate of cell proliferation and dendritic complexity of newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in Ts65Dn mice. Our investigation revealed that improving β2 adrenergic signaling led to a significant increase in the density of microglia in the dentate gyrus of Ts65Dn mice. Since microglia activation has been linked to increased Aβ clearance, our data suggests that improving adrenergic signaling might also reduce the severity of Aβ pathology in adults DS showing significant AD-related pathology. All these data support the idea that improving NE-signaling particularity activation of β2 adrenergic receptors might be an effective strategy in improving cognitive function in both AD and DS.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Chemogenetics: a transformational technology for neuroscience

Bryan L. Roth, MD, PhD

Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program, Michael Hooker Chair Protein Therapeutics , Professor of Pharmacology, UNC Chapel Hill Medical School Chapel Hill


1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Engineering reproducible neural tissue from pluripotent stem cells

Stephanie Willerth, PhD

Assistant Professor, University of Victoria Engineering, Canada

The Willerth lab investigates how to engineer neural tissue by combining pluripotent stem cells, controlled drug delivery and biomaterial scaffolds. When generating these replacement tissues, we use both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as these cells can become any cell type found in the body, including those cells found in the nervous system. Our recent projects have used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), which are adult cells reprogrammed back into an embryonic stem cell-like state, leading to the possibility of generating patient specific pluripotent stem cell lines with a reduced risk of immune rejection post transplantation. Recent work suggests that these hiPSC lines show a decreased risk of tumor formation compared to traditional embryonic stem cells, further enhancing their clinical relevance. To generate neural tissue, we seed these cells into different types of drug releasing scaffolds. These novel biomaterial scaffolds direct the stem cells to form functional neural tissue by delivering appropriate chemical and physical signals. Once we fully understand how to engineer neural tissue from stem cells, we can then apply these principles to produce other tissues found in the body.

Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

How Subtle and "Benevolent" Biases Undermine Women's Advancement in the Sciences

Peter Glick, PhD

Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of the Social Sciences, Professor of Psychology, Lawrence University

Discrimination against women has typically been attributed to hostile and demeaning stereotypes about womens capabilities. However, a growing body of evidence shows that subjectively positive, but patronizing views undermine and sabotage women in traditionally masculine occupations, including STEM fields. Specifically, benevolent sexism the belief that women are wonderful but fragile, and require mens protection and assistance limits womens opportunities, leads to soft and uninformative feedback, and undermines womens performance by creating intrusive thoughts that interfere with executive functioning. Relatedly, subjectively positive, but prescriptive stereotypes that women should be warmer than men create backlash when women assert themselves (e.g., promote their work). Because benevolently, as compared to hostile, sexist attitudes are more widely accepted and (falsely) viewed as harmless, women as well as men often endorse benevolently sexist views. Women who internalize benevolent sexism show less ambitious educational and occupational aspirations, increased concern that career success will interfere with heterosexual romance, and greater tolerance for gender inequality. The first step in combating these problems is to recognize that benevolent sexism has nontrivial and insidious effects on female scientists. Organizations that train and employ science can systematically reduce bias and increase womens success by attending to and modifying subtle cues that signal to women that they dont belong. Organizations can also promote wise mentoring, which involves: (a) believing and communicating that scientific talent develops through training (is not fixed and unchanging), (b) combining critical feedback using high standards with (c) messages that the mentee belongs, has promise, and is being given the feedback to accelerate her or his development.

BRAIN Initiative

6:00 AM - 7:00 AM PT

The Novel Neurotechnology: implications for science, medicine and society

Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD

NIH Director's Pioneer Awardee, Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience, Columbia University, Co-director of the Kavli Foundations Institute for Neural Circuitry

In physical systems built with many components, emergent properties, such as magnetism, are often generated from the interactions among these particles. These emergent properties are often invisible when observing individual particles, since they depend on large-scale interactions between them. Likewise, the function of neural circuits has been mostly studied by examining the responses of individual neuron, yet it is probably an emergent property that arises from the coordinated activity of large numbers of neurons.
To capture this emergent level of brain function, we proposed to launch a large-scale, international public project, the Brain Activity Map Project (which has become the BRAIN Initiative), aimed at developing new methods to measure and control neural activity across complete neural circuits in experimental animals and human patients. This technological effort will be an interdisciplinary project, incorporating into neuroscience many methods and approaches from the physical sciences and nanotechnologies.
The data obtained with these new methodscould prove to be an invaluable step towards understanding fundamental and pathological brain processes.

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science and funding overview

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T


8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science overview

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies
(BRAIN) Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at
revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. By accelerating
the development and application of innovative technologies, researchers
will be able to produce a revolutionary new dynamic picture of the brain
that, for the first time, shows how individual cells and complex neural
circuits interact in both time and space. Long desired by researchers
seeking new ways to treat, cure, and even prevent brain disorders, this
picture will fill major gaps in our current knowledge and provide
unprecedented opportunities for exploring exactly how the brain enables
the human body to record, process, utilize, store, and retrieve vast
quantities of information, all at the speed of thought. (NIH website)
The NIH Directors working group identified circuit-level analysis of
the nervous system as the primary research goal of the NIH BRAIN
Initiative, mapping the circuits of the brain, measuring their activity
patterns within the circuits and understanding how their interplay
creates unique cognitive and behavioral capabilities.
In the presentation format the invited distinguished speakers and
panelists will give an overview of the BRAIN Initiative, its research
goals and challenges to achieve them. In president Obamas words this is
one of the Grand Challenges of the 21st century. Presentations will be
followed by interactive moderated panel discussions.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Brain Computer Interfaces: Neurotech in the Future of Neuroscience

Lana Morrow, PhD

Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

When speaking of neurodegenerative diseases, average public is not made aware of the true cost that brain related disorders have on annual budget. The true impact on economy is not usually the direct cost of healthcare, but rather, loss of daily productivity, of not only the primary person affected, but also of the caretakers and family. Primary caretaker functions like a manager for the case. He or she loses days of work because of caretakers needs and involvement. Secondary impact on the case is anxiety and depression ensuing the illness, not only present in the primary patient, but also in family members. This further decreases productivity on the global scale. Thomas Insel, the director of NIMH suggested
three approaches to estimate global economic burden: (a) a standard cost of illness method, (b) macroeconomic simulation, and (c) the value of a statistical life. The results of all three methods project staggering costs over the next two decades, with cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental health representing a cumulative output loss of $47 Trillions, roughly 75% of the global GDP in 2010. Over 2 billion people suffer from brain-based related productivity loss, which translates into a 2 trillion economic burden. One approach is to find innovative ways to prevent and treat diseases in a more economically feasible ways: neurotechnology and biotechnology of healthcare.

Keynote

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PT

When good neurons go bad: Dopamine neuron regulation and its disruption in schizophrenia and depression

Anthony Grace, PhD

Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh


Nervous System Development & Function

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Age-Dependent Responses of Dendrite Structure to Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity

Kristen Harris, PhD

Associate Chair, Department of Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience , Fellow Center for Learning and Memory, University of Texas at Austin

Dendritic spine shape enables sequestering of subcellular components needed for synaptic plasticity, including polyribosomes for local protein synthesis, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) to regulate calcium and glutamate receptor trafficking, endosomes for redistribution of proteins and membrane, and the Golgi-like spine apparatus. In hippocampus and elsewhere, synapse size correlates with presynaptic vesicle numbers, which are greater in the presence of sparsely distributed mitochondria and perisynaptic astroglial processes. Diversity in composition signifies synapse-specific structural plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning well-suited to the investigation of structural synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal LTP in the rat has an abrupt onset at postnatal day 12 (P12) that is associated with the first occurrence of dendritic spines. In mature hippocampus, LTP results in loss of small dendritic spines with compensatory enlargement of remaining spine synapses, leading to a balanced sum total of synaptic surface area per dendritic segment (i.e. structural synaptic scaling). This structural scaling occurs as presynaptic vesicles are recruited to vesicle free zones, with pre-existing postsynaptic densities at the edges of synapses, thereby enlarging the synaptic active zone of potentiated synapses. A similar form of scaling occurs in the mature dentate gyrus in vivo, where dendritic spines and synapses enlarge with LTP in the middle molecular layer, but shrink in the inner and outer molecular layers that have concurrent long-term depression. At P15, LTP results in more dendritic spines without compensatory scaling in synapse size. Polyribosomes show differential dynamics at both young and mature ages depending on whether LTP was induced by tetanic or theta-burst stimulation. At P15, endosomes are rapidly recruited to enlarge spines. At immature and adult ages, the dendritic shaft contains SER that forms bridges where glutamate receptor trafficking is slowed in regions of high spine density. The SER becomes more tubular during LTP, a configuration that facilitates glutamate receptor trafficking. At both immature and adult ages, presynaptic vesicle counts are reduced with LTP, a phenomenon related to the presence of presynaptic recycling endosomes and mitochondria. In contrast to LTP, the response of mature dendrites to blocked synaptic transmission involves proliferation of spines, which does not occur on immature dendrites until after postnatal day 21. Thus, hippocampal synapses have unequal and sometimes opposite responses to plasticity-inducing activity depending on age and paradigm.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Src Regulation of Lamellipodia, Filopodia, and Substrate-Cytoskeletal Coupling in Neuronal Growth Cones

Daniel Suter, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University

Axonal growth and pathfinding is fundamental to the development and regeneration of the nervous system. Src tyrosine kinase has been implicated in this process; however, the detailed molecular and cellular mechanisms involving Src regulation of neuronal growth cone motility are not fully understood. We have focused on two potential roles of Src: (1) control of coupling between cell adhesion receptors and the underlying actin cytoskeleton and (2) regulation of actin dynamics and organization in lamellipodia and filopodia. Src2 and the Src substrate and actin binding protein cortactin accumulate at adhesion sites induced by the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule apCAM. Tension application increases Src2 activation state, while Src inhibition uncouples apCAM from actin flow. Expression of constitutively active (CA) Src2 increases density and lateral movements of filopodia in Aplysia growth cones, while the expression of dominant negative (DN) Src2 or cortactin phosphorylation mutants have opposite effects, suggesting a positive role of Src2 and cortactin in filopodia formation and integration within the lamellipodial actin network. On the other hand, analysis of filopodial actin dynamics suggests only a minor role for Src2 and cortactin in regulating actin assembly during filopodial extension. CA Src2- and cortactin-expressing growth cones have wider lamellipodia and spend more time in leading edge protrusion compared with control growth cones, suggesting that Src2 activity enhances actin assembly in growth cone lamellipodia. In summary, our results indicate that Src2/cortactin regulate lamellipodia protrusion and filopodia formation in neuronal growth cones as well as force transduction at apCAM adhesion sites.

Neurological Diseases from Lab to Clinic

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

A Unique B Cell Derived Signature of Multiple Sclerosis and its Biologic Implications

Benjamin Greenberg, MD

Associate Professor Cain Denius Scholar in Mobility Disorders, Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that leads to widespread pathology within the central nervous system (CNS) and is the most common cause of neurologic disability among young adults within the US. Pathologic descriptions of multiples sclerosis have documented damage to the myelin sheath around axons and to underlying neurons. The mechanism of damage has long been ascribed to auto reactive T cells that infiltrate the CNS and cause tissue injury. Over the last decade, however, a significant amount of data has implicated a deranged B cell biology in the pathogenesis of this disabling condition. Work completed within labs at UT Southwestern have identified a novel pattern of somatic hypermutation among B cells from MS patients. This pattern is currently being studied as a potential new biomarker or diagnostic test for the condition. Continued research has begun to determine the antigenic targets of this deranged B cell biology and will point the field in new research directions. This presentation will present data relative to the identified pattern of somatic hypermutation from MS patients, the biology of the produced antibodies from these unique cells and implications for future research.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

Remyelinating the adult central nervous system: Repairing injury in MS

Ari Green, MD

Director of UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center, Director of UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center, Rachleff Endowed Professor, Associate Professor of Neurology and Opthalmology, UCSF School of Medicine

Multiple Sclerosis is a debilitating neurodegnerative disease of the central nervous system in which the immune system targets and destroys myelin sheaths surrounding axons. Progressive and permanent neurological disability in the disease is caused by the ultimate loss of the underlying axons themselves. Nearly a dozen FDA-approved therapies exist to help reduce the inflammation that contributes to immune mediated injury or prevent the influx of immune cells from peripheral circulation into the CNS. However, to date there are no therapies capable of protecting axon loss and/or regenerating lost myelin. There are compelling reasons to think that maintenance or restoration of myelin integrity would help with protection of axons from loss and injury. Myelin in the CNS is an extension of the plasma membrane from mature oligodendrocytes - a specialized cell type whose principal purpose is to provide the myelin needed to ensheath axons. The precursor cell for oligodendrocytes known as OPCs are tiled throughout the CNS, but they don't appear to adequately differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes capable of restoring myelination to denuded axons. This talk will discuss the use of a novel high throughput screen for the identification of small molecules with the capacity to induce oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin wrapping. It will also discuss the validation of the "hits" from this screening assay and the rapid introduction of these therapeutic targets to patients including the selection of targets focusing on mechanism of action and BBB penetration. This will include discussion of the importance of development of clinical trial outcomes for the advancement of successful therapeutic programs in neuroprotection.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

MS Bioscreen: From the Bedside to the Bench and Back

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, PhD, MPH

Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

We present a personalized medicine suite of software applications developed at UCSF for multiple sclerosis (MS): the MS Bioscreen. This new tool addresses the challenges of the dynamic management of complex chronic diseases such as MS; the interaction of physicians and patients with such a tool illustrates the extent to which translational digital medicine i.e. the application of information technology to medicinehas the potential to radically transform medical practice. It integrates clinical data including MRI brain imaging and research data with immunological and genetic biomarkers such as SNPs associated with MS risk and HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. With the development of the MS Bioscreen we introduce three key evolutionary phases in displaying the data to health care providers, patients, and researchers: visualization (accessing data), contextualization (understanding the data), and actionable interpretation (real-time use of the data to support decision-making). Together these features form the stepping-stones that are expected to accelerate standardization of data across platforms, promote evidence-based medicine, and lead to improved patient outcomes.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Abeta oligomer receptor antagonists as disease-modifying Alzheimers therapeutics

Susan Catalano, PhD

Founder and Chief Science Officer, Cognition Therapeutics, Inc.

Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic Amyloid beta (Abeta)1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimers disease (AD). Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins are reported to inhibit synaptic plasticity mechanisms such as long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in hippocampal neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance. We have discovered small molecules with high affinity for Abeta oligomer receptors that displace Abeta oligomer binding in vitro and in human AD patient brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner, and both prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking, synapse loss and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. Our evidence suggests that despite structural heterogeneity, Abeta oligomers bind saturably and reversibly to specific receptors at synapses, and that the Abeta oligomer-induced synaptotoxicity underlying Alzheimers disease has a pharmacological basis that is amenable to treatment with small molecules. The compounds we have discovered therefore represent promising Alzheimers disease-modifying therapeutic drug candidates.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

ABCA1 and APOE: Intertwined roles in Alzheimers disease

Radosveta Koldamova, MD, PhD

Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh

ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux to lipid-free apolipoproteins such as apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and apolipoprotein E (apoE). ABCA1 is essential regulator of high density lipoprotein generation (HDL) a role that defines its significance for cardiovascular disease. ABCA1 and APOE are transcriptionally regulated by Liver X Receptors (LXR) and Retinoic X Receptors (RXR).
The inheritance of 4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimers disease (AD). Patients carrying APOE4 allele, compared to those with the other two isoforms, have more amyloid plaques a finding replicated in human Amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. Recent data suggest that ABCA1 via its control over apoE lipidation may have a role in AD. Studies from our and other groups have demonstrated that lack of ABCA1 increases amyloid deposition and cognitive decline in different AD model mice accompanied by significant decrease in the levels of apoE and apoA-I. In contrast, treatment with LXR or RXR ligands increases ABCA1 and apoE levels and significantly ameliorates amyloid pathology. In a recent study using APP mice we demonstrated that ABCA1 haplo deficiency had a differential effect on the phenotype of APOE3 or APOE4 expressing mice. The lack of one copy of Abca1 significantly aggravated memory deficits, Aβ plaques and Aβ clearance in APP/APOE4 but not in APP/APOE3 mice. Interestingly, we found a correlation between HDL in plasma and amyloid load in brain, suggesting a causative connection between peripheral lipoproteins and Aβ load in the CNS.
In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that future therapies targeting ABCA1 and APOE expression such as LXR/RXR agonists could have a favorable effect on the outcome in AD patients including APO4 carriers.

Neurological Dysfunction from Genes to Human Disease

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

NMDA receptor regulation in health and disease

Michael Salter, MD, PhD, FRSC

Head and Senior Scientist of Neurosciences & Mental Health, Associate Chief of Science Strategy Research, Sick Kids Research Institute

Neuron-glial interactions are increasingly recognized as being key for physiological and pathological processes in the central nervous system. Microglia have been found to play a causal role in neuropathic pain behaviours resulting from peripheral nerve injury, and a core neuron-microglia-neuron signaling pathway has been elucidated. Within the dorsal horn, microglia suppress neuronal inhibition by a cascade involving activation of microglial P2X4 receptors causing the release of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF acts on trkB receptors which leads to a rise in intracellular chloride concentration in dorsal horn nociceptive output neurons, transforming the response properties of these neurons. In addition to suppressing inhibition, peripheral nerve injury causes activity-dependent facilitation at dorsal horn glutamatergic synapses which enhances nociceptive transmission. This enhancement is mediated by intracellular signaling networks involving serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases within nociceptive transmission neurons. Key for this enhancement is facilitation of NMDA receptor function by Src family tyrosine kinases. Microglia-to-neuron signaling is not only critical for pain hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury but also for the paradoxical hyperalgesic effect of morphine and other opioids. We anticipate that by targeting microglia-neuron signaling pathways new therapeutic strategies for chronic pain as well as its comorbid sequelae may be developed.

Neurological Diseases from Lab to Clinic

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Huntingtons Disease: Twenty years and counting

Margaret Sutherland, PhD

Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster, NIH/NINDS

Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, inherited, degenerative brain disorder that produces physical, mental and emotional changes. Named for George Huntington, the physician who first described the illness in 1872, Huntington's disease used to be known as Huntington's chorea, from the Greek for choreography, or dance. The name refers to the involuntary, jerky movements that can develop in later stages of the illness. In 1993, a consortium of scientists from six laboratories found the mutation, an expanded CAG repeat sequence, of 36 repeats or more, in exon 1 of the HTT gene on chromosome 4 that is responsible for Huntingtons disease. Since that seminal discovery many basic science advances have been made in understanding the pathways, proteins and DNA sequences that either the wild type and/or mutant protein impact. In fact, it is this plethora of possible targets that challenges current drug discovery efforts around small molecules or biologics that could either slow and/or stop the progression of this disease. This lecture will highlight unique aspects of Huntingtons disease basic, translational and clinical science that have contributed to our current knowledge of this disease and emphasize several key discoveries and technologies that are offering unique opportunities for future research and potential breakthroughs.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

The potential of robotic technology as a next generation technology for neurological assessment

Stephen Scott, PhD

Professor Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queens University School of Medicine

Assessment of sensorimotor and cognitive function plays a crucial role in all facets of patient care, from diagnosing the specific disease or injury, to management and monitoring of rehabilitation strategies to ameliorate dysfunction. Most assessment scales for sensorimotor function are subjective in nature with relatively coarse rating systems, reflecting that it is difficult for even an experienced observer to discriminate small changes in performance using only the naked eye. Robotic technologies have had a profound impact in basic research to understand fundamental properties of sensorimotor control due to their ability to control the position or forces applied to the limb and their inherent ability to objectively quantify motor behavior. Our general hypothesis is that these same attributes make robotic technologies ideal for creating a new approach to neurological assessment. I will discuss a number of novel robot-based tasks weve developed to assess brain function in subjects with stroke, highlighting the complex patterns of sensory, motor and cognitive deficits that can be quantified with this technology.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Neurogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease

Orly Lazarov, PhD

Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois College of Medicine

Neural stem cells exist in the adult mammalian brain throughout life. They reside in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone. Neural stem cells have the capability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glia. The existence of neurogenesis permits high level of brain plasticity and provides a source for cellular replacement. Importantly, new neurons play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Thus, modulation of neurogenesis has a high therapeutic value, once the molecular signaling regulating these processes is unraveled. This might be particularly critical for aging-linked cognitive decline, such as occurs in Alzheimers disease. Neurogenesis is impaired early in life in Alzheimers mouse models, and major players in Alzheimers disease regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. This lecture will discuss the molecular link between neurogenesis and Alzheimers disease and the ways by which impairments in neurogeneis may contribute to or exacerbate the disease. Finally, we will discuss neurogenesis-based therapy for the amelioration or attenuation of Alzheimers disease.

Nervous System Development & Function

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

Axonal Protein Synthesis in Neurodevelopment and -degeneration

Ulrich Hengst, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology , Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease, Columbia University

Spatially restricted protein synthesis is an important mechanism for the development and maintenance of many morphologically polarized cells including neurons. While most proteins are synthesized in the neuronal soma and transported into axons and dendrites, a comparably small subset of mRNAs is transported into the periphery of the neurons and only translated in response to specific signals. Work over the last two decades has established the existence of local protein synthesis in axons and provided insight into the differences between between dendritic and axonal translation. In this talk we will review the importance of local protein synthesis for the development, regeneration and maintenance of axons and address open questions such as the specific advantages of localized protein synthesis and its potential role in the mature or degenerating nervous system.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

Cholinergic modulation of visual perception in rodents

Elvire Vaucher, PhD

Full professor Ecole doptomtrie, Universit de Montral, Qubec, Canada

The cholinergic system is a potent neuromodulatory system which plays a critical role in cortical plasticity, attention and learning. The cholinergic activation of the cortex increases the signal-to-noise ratio, cue detection ability and the strength of the thalamocortical afferences relative to cortico-cortical signaling. These changes facilitate the treatment of a novel stimulus.
We are particularly interested in the role of the cholinergic system in visual processing and cortical plasticity of the visual cortex (V1). Our laboratory uses a large panel of techniques behaviour, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and optical imaging - to examine this issue from a cellular to an integrated and behavioural level. We have recently demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) was released in V1 during a pattern visual activation. The cholinergic deficit impaired the visually-induced neuronal activity in the layer 4 of V1 and the performance of the rat in a visual learning task. Moreover, deletion of different subtypes of muscarinic receptors in KO mice selectively altered the intrinsic organization of V1 suggesting a strong involvement of the muscarinic transmission in the detectability of visual stimuli. The transient coupling of cholinergic and pattern visual stimulation induced a long-term enhancement of the visual evoked potentials mediated by muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptors. This cholinergic-induced long-term modifications of the cortical functioning also improved visual perception. Activation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation over two weeks induced a long-term increase of visual evoked potentials in V1 and of the visual acuity of the rats.
Our results demonstrate that the pairing of the cholinergic system activation with visual training improved the visual performance of the animals and functional organization of V1. This study opens the possibility of boosting V1 plasticity and facilitating visual recovery.
Supported by CIHR, NSERC, FRQS Vision Research Network.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Disinhibition Drives Rapid Movement and Associative Motor Memory Formation in the Cerebellum

Paul Mathews, PhD

Postdoctoral research scientist, UCLA

Motor coordination relies on accurate predictions that specify how the body should move in particular sensorimotor contexts. Although such predictions are thought to be stored as associative motor memories in the cerebellum, the circuit mechanisms by which they form and are acted upon remain unclear. Correlates of such memories, typically reductions in the firing rate of Purkinje neurons in advance of a learned movement, have been observed in the firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Given that Purkinje neurons powerfully inhibit deep cerebellar nuclei neurons, and that some deep cerebellar nuclei neurons project directly to motor nuclei like the red nucleus, pauses in spontaneous Purkinje neuron firing have the potential to drive motor output. However, it is unclear whether reductions in Purkinje neuron firing alone are sufficient to drive movement, and if so whether their ability to drive movement depends upon prior learning. To examine these questions we have utilized an approach to selectively manipulate Purkinje neuron firing activity in an awake, behaving animal while simultaneously monitoring cellular activity or motor movement. Together, the results I will present indicate movements driven by Purkinje neuron pauses are influenced by whether or not learning has occurred, and support the hypothesis that during learning Purkinje neuron activity instructs memory-related changes in the deep cerebellar nucleus.

Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

Biomarkers, Cognition and Cognitive Reserve in Alzheimers Disease

Prashanthi Vemuri, PhD

Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic

Late onset dementia is usually a multi-factorial disease wherein cumulative pathological brain insults (of more than one pathology) results in progressive cognitive decline which ultimately leads to impairment in ones ability to function at work and/or perform usual activities/tasks. Until recently, postmortem examination has been the only way to accurately determine the underlying pathology that led to dementia. However with the recent emergence of advanced imaging technologies, imaging indicators of disease that closely reflect the underlying pathology have been found to be very useful in aiding the prediction of the underlying dementia pathology.
In the first part of the talk, we will discuss how different biomarkers could be used to measure different aspects of Alzheimers disease (AD) pathology, a leading cause of dementia and how they can aid in answering several important questions about the disease processes. In the second part of the talk, we will talk about the concept of cognitive reserve (CR) and how it may aid in delaying the onset of dementia. CR is the term often used to explain why about 30% of cognitively normal subjects with AD pathology do not show any cognitive symptoms. Our recent studies have shown that even though CR does not appear to impact the degree of pathological deposition in the brain but it has an independent effect on cognitive performance wherein subjects with higher reserve have a greater capacity to cope with pathological insults and these individual differences in reserve mechanisms help explain why cognitive decline may be initiated at different times in relation to the onset of pathology.

Learning Objectives:
1) Discuss how the role of biomarkers in Alzheimers disease
2) Describe the concept of cognitive reserve and explain the mechanisms through which it delays the onset of Alzheimers disease

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Neuroimaging Informatics: Distributed Resources for 'Big' Cognition

David N. Kennedy, PhD

Professor, Univ of Massachusettes Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Director of the Division of Neuroinformatics at the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative

Neuroimaging plays a large role in our pursuit of the understanding of behavior and cognition in health and disease. The past decade has seen the emergence of a wealth of resources that support this pursuit. The increasing complexity of this landscape of resources necessitates the development of resource management systems to support researchers in navigating this big data environment.

The Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC) is a neuroimaging informatics knowledge environment for structural and functional imaging, clinical neuroinformatics, genomics and computational neuroscience. Initiated in 2006 through the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, NITRCs mission is to foster a user-friendly knowledge environment for the neuroinformatics community.

NITRC is comprised of three integrated services. The NITRC-Resources website (nitrc.org) facilitates the finding of software and data. To support the need for expanded data hosting, the NITRC Image Registry (NITRC-IR) provides a data sharing solution. Once a user finds software and data, local processing is likely to become rate limiting as the magnitude of the shared datasets gets larger. This prompted the development of the NITRC Computational Environment (NITRC-CE), a cloud-based, high-performance, computational platform tailored to the needs of the NITRC community.

In this presentation, we will review the general functionality of the NITRC suite of services and explore the applications of these tools to example cognitive and behavioral questions as supported by various neuroimaging initiatives. Integrating data from the '1000 Functional Connectomes' project, the Autism Brain Image Data Exchange (ABIDE), the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) and the Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition and Genetics (PING) projects, as examples, will highlight the utility of these approaches in integrating many disparate information sources in support of a unified analytic strategy.

BRAIN Initiative

6:00 AM - 7:00 AM PT

Connectomics - Defining Neural Circuits to Understand Brain Function

Scott W. Emmons, PhD

Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics, Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Connectomics is a new field of research that aims to map the synapses of the nervous system in order to construct a wiring diagram of all the neural circuits. It is necessary to use the electron microscope to visualize synapses, so at present the connectomes of most animal species cannot be determined. Currently, the only known connectome is that of the tiny nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans is an excellent model for understanding how the nervous system controls behavior. The wiring diagram of the C. elegans nervous system represents a neural network. Many of the features of this network help us understand how animal nervous systems function.

Learning objectives:
1. Connectomics is a new field of study that aims to identify the circuits of the nervous system.
2. The connectome of the nematode worm C. elegans, which is the only currently known complete wiring diagram of an animal nervous system, is a neural network with features that help explain its function.

7:00 AM - 8:00 AM PT

Tools for Mapping Brain Computations

Edward S. Boyden, PhD

Joint Professor at MIT, Synthetic Neurobiology Research Group, AT&T Career Development Associate Professor, MIT

The brain is a complex, densely wired circuit made out of heterogeneous cells, which vary in their shapes, molecular composition, and patterns of connectivity. In order to help discover how neural circuits implement brain functions, and how these computations go awry in brain disorders, we invent technologies to enable the scalable, systematic observation and control of biological structures and processes in the living brain. We have developed genetically-encoded reagents that, when expressed in specific neuron types in the nervous system, enable their electrical activities to be precisely driven or silenced in response to millisecond timescale pulses of light. I will give an overview of these "optogenetic"
tools, adapted from natural photosensory and photosynthetic proteins, and discuss new tools we are developing, including molecules with novel color sensitivities (e.g., Chrimson, Jaws) and other unique capabilities (e.g., Chronos). We are also developing optogenetic tools that enable activation of endogenous protein and signaling pathways (e.g., lumitoxins). Often working in interdisciplinary collaborations, we have developed microfabricated hardware to enable complex and distributed neural circuits to be controlled and observed in a fully 3-D fashion, as well as robots that can automatically record neurons intracellularly and integratively in live brain, and strategies for building 3-D brain circuits in vitro. These tools are in widespread use to enable systematic analysis of neural circuit functions, are also opening up new frontiers on the understanding and treatment of brain disorders, and may serve as components of new platforms for diagnosing and treating brain disease

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM PT

The Human Connectome Project

David Van Essen, PhD

Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine


9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - funding overview

Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield

Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF

The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies
(BRAIN) Initiative is part of a new Presidential focus aimed at
revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. By accelerating
the development and application of innovative technologies, researchers
will be able to produce a revolutionary new dynamic picture of the brain
that, for the first time, shows how individual cells and complex neural
circuits interact in both time and space. Long desired by researchers
seeking new ways to treat, cure, and even prevent brain disorders, this
picture will fill major gaps in our current knowledge and provide
unprecedented opportunities for exploring exactly how the brain enables
the human body to record, process, utilize, store, and retrieve vast
quantities of information, all at the speed of thought. (NIH website)
The NIH Directors working group identified circuit-level analysis of
the nervous system as the primary research goal of the NIH BRAIN
Initiative, mapping the circuits of the brain, measuring their activity
patterns within the circuits and understanding how their interplay
creates unique cognitive and behavioral capabilities.
In the presentation format the invited distinguished speakers and
panelists will give an overview of the BRAIN Initiative, its research
goals and challenges to achieve them. In president Obamas words this is
one of the Grand Challenges of the 21st century. Presentations will be
followed by interactive moderated panel discussions.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM PT

BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science and funding overview

Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield

Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF


Emerging Therapies, Technologies and Methods

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Neuroeconomy; Economic Impact of Neurodegenerative Diseases both in the US and Globally

Lana Morrow, PhD

Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

When speaking of neurodegenerative diseases, average public is not made aware of the true cost that brain related disorders have on annual budget. The true impact on economy is not usually the direct cost of healthcare, but rather, loss of daily productivity, of not only the primary person affected, but also of the caretakers and family. Primary caretaker functions like a manager for the case. He or she loses days of work because of caretakers needs and involvement. Secondary impact on the case is anxiety and depression ensuing the illness, not only present in the primary patient, but also in family members. This further decreases productivity on the global scale. Thomas Insel, the director of NIMH suggested
three approaches to estimate global economic burden: (a) a standard cost of illness method, (b) macroeconomic simulation, and (c) the value of a statistical life. The results of all three methods project staggering costs over the next two decades, with cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental health representing a cumulative output loss of $47 Trillions, roughly 75% of the global GDP in 2010. Over 2 billion people suffer from brain-based related productivity loss, which translates into a 2 trillion economic burden. One approach is to find innovative ways to prevent and treat diseases in a more economically feasible ways: neurotechnology and biotechnology of healthcare.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Cross-talk & Developmental Programs A Key to Translational Stem Cell Biology

Evan W. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.P

Director Stem Cell Research Center & Core Facility, Professor, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Inst, Faculty Physician, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego

The therapeutic utility of stem cells is rooted in an understanding -- and exploitation -- of their natural role from earliest development to lifes end. Their job is first to participate in organogenesis and then to maintain homeostasis of that organ (e.g., the nervous system) in the face of perturbations. Accomplishment of these goals requires numerous actions, cell replacement representing but one. The tasks, in fact, require extensive cross-talk between multiple cell types (including stem cell-derived progeny themselves) and the unfolding of complex developmental programs. This complexity actually enriches the therapeutic potential of the stem cell.
We study the behavior of neural stem cells (NSCs) in various models of injury and degeneration. During neurodegeneration and inflammation, factors are transiently elaborated which draw NSCs (even over great distances) to engage the niche and attempt restoration of equipoise by a variety of mechanisms. These actions include differentiating towards the replacement of impaired neural cells, both neurons and non-neuronal chaperone cells, all of which are essential for restitution of function. NSCs elaborate factors that promote neuroprotection, trophic support, differentiation, neuritogenesis, connectivity, angiogenesis, inhibition of inflammation and scarring. In addition to producing diffusible factors, NSCs communicate via gap junctions to re-equilibrate the intracellular metabolism of endangered neurons. NSCs may serve as vehicles for protein delivery enabling simultaneous cell and gene therapy. NSCs synergize with biomaterials to "re-engineer" damaged regions. Multimodal approaches are likely required for most neurological conditions; NSCs may serve as the glue. When studied in vitro (development- or disease-in-a-dish), NSCs may help identify novel mechanisms, drug targets, and the drugs themselves.
While repair may entail recapitulating developmental programs, pathology (e.g., cancer) may represent the perversion of such programs. Thwarting such pathology, may involve the pharmacological re-establishment of the proper program.
These various themes will be discussed.

Keynote

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PT

Using brain imaging and biomarkers for diagnosis and investigation of Alzheimer's disease "The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiat

Michael Weiner, MD

Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease, Neuroimaging Initiative, Professor in Residence, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder producing cognitive impairment and dementia in millions of elders. Currently no treatment is effective to slow the progression of AD. Major obstacles to developing effective treatments are: 1) a reliance on clinical symptoms and a lack of biomarkers for diagnosis 2) uncertainty concerning which biomarkers are best to identify disease stage and to predict progression 3) lack of standardization and 4) absence of naturalistic data to provide a basis for clinical trial design, problem in the field. To address these issues ADNI was funded for a total of $140 million, as a public/private partnership between the National Institute of Aging and a consortium of pharmaceutical companies (including Swiss companies). The goal of ADNI (from 2004-present see ADNI-info.org) has been to standardize and determine the value of MRI and PET imaging together with blood and CSF biomarkers for disease modifying Alzheimers treatment trials. In our initial project (ADNI1), we longitudinally studied: MCI (n= 400); AD (n= 200); Controls (n= 220) with clinical visits, neuropsychological assessments, MRI (1.5 T), FDG PET, blood and urine, and CSF. About 300 subjects from ADNI 1 continue to be followed. We found that the rate of hippocampal atrophy had high statistical power for measuring change over time. Normal healthy elders with APOE4 and/or low CSF Aβ amyloid have worse memory scores and higher rates of hippocampal atrophy, consistent with the view that about 30% of healthy elders in their 70s have preclinical AD pathology. Similar ADNI-like projects, with similar methods, are underway in Australia, Japan, Europe, China, Taiwan, and Korea leading to the World Wide ADNI network. The Parkinsons Progressive Markers Initiative (PPMI) has been modeled after ADNI. ADNI 2 with 3Tesla MRI and F18 amyloid PET imaging with Florbetapir on an additional 150 controls, 100 normal subjects with cognitive complaints, 300 subjects with early MCI, 150 subjects with late MCI , 150 subjects with dementia due to AD. Thus a total of about 1700 subjects have been enrolled and are followed longitudinally. Whole genome sequencing on 800 subjects is available. All ADNI data is available to all scientists in the world, on USC/LONI/ADNI, without embargo. Blood and CSF samples can be requested. ADNI methods are now widely used in clinical treatment trials, and have led to the development of the new research criteria. Over 600 papers have been written on ADNI data and all scientists are encouraged to explore this rich data set and publish their results. It is expected that ADNI will substantially contribute to identifying accurate diagnostic techniques and effective treatments to slow the progression and prevent Alzheimers disease.

Neurological Dysfunction from Genes to Human Disease

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT

Impairments of brain network connectivity in autism

Ralph-Axel Mueller, PhD

Director of the Brain Development Imaging Lab, Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University

With a rising prevalence recently exceeding 1%, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has become a pressing public health issue. Crucial hurdles on the way to targeted treatments are (i) the reliance on behavioral diagnostic criteria for disorder known to be neurological in nature, and (ii) the lack of knowledge about biologically defined subtypes that may be linked to identifiable sets of genetic (and environmental) risk factors. Despite a plethora of neuroscientific findings, fully sensitive and specific brain biomarkers have not been identified. However, there are strong indications from genetics, postmortem literature, and neuroimaging supporting the investigation of brain network connectivity as a promising source of the needed biomarkers. Functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has been one widely applied method, but with a recently grown awareness of methodological issues, the initial model of general underconnectivity has to be revised in favor of concepts such as impaired network integration and differentiation in ASD. Anatomical connectivity has been primarily studied with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), with findings supporting atypical age-related changes in tract maturation and organization as well as widespread white matter compromise in adolescents and adults with ASD. Multimodal imaging approaches will be crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of network abnormalities in ASD, but findings from fcMRI and DTI reflect different parameters of connectivity and do not always coincide. The mandate of hypothesis-driven investigation may create as much harm as good in the specific case of ASD research, as data-mining techniques (such as machine learning diagnostic classification) may be uniquely suited to uncover complex patterns of biomarkers.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PT

The Genetics of Alzheimer's disease

Alison Goate, D.Phil

Samuel & Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Neurology, Dept. of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine

Alzheimers disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically by progress decline in memory and thinking and pathologically by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The strongest risk factors for AD are age family history. Early genetic studies of AD focused on families where the disease exhibited an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Genetic studies in these families identified mutations in three genes that generally cause an early onset form of the disease. These genes pointed to the amyloid peptide, which is the primary component of the senile plaques as central to disease pathogenesis. Subsequent studies in the late onset form of the disease using genome-wide approaches to study both common and rare genetic variation have identified evidence for many more genes that can influence risk for AD. These studies have uncovered other pathways including innate immunity and lipid metabolism that also play key roles in disease risk and point to potential therapeutic targets for treatment of disease.

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PT

The role of high throughput sequencing in the research and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders

Peter L Nagy, MD, PhD

Director of Next-Gen Sequencing Laboratory Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine, Associate Professor, Columbia University

Using high throughput next-generation sequencing to simultaneously search large number of genes for pathogenic mutations has numerous advantages. It decreases the pressure to narrow the differential diagnosis for diseases with overlapping phenotypes, can identify entirely new causative private mutations when no good candidate genes are available, and shorten the patients diagnostic odyssey. The Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine at Columbia University started offering mitochondrial genome, partial and whole exome sequencing for clinical diagnostic purposes in January 2013. In my talk I will highlight the effectiveness of next-gen sequencing in diagnosing neurological and neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore I will discuss the use of next-gen sequencing technologies to evaluate transcriptional and translational changes that might define these conditions in cell culture and animal model systems. Finally, I will propose some practical steps that would improve the effectiveness of next-gen sequencing diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders and present my view of the near future based on the technologies that are available or will soon become available.

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PT

Genetics of Parkinsons disease

Katerina Venderova, PhD

Assistant Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of the Pacific, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Parkinsons disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Over the past few years, studies have identified a number of genes that cause or contribute to the pathogenesis of this disorder. Pathophysiologically, Parkinsons disease is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons, a process that to this date cannot be effectively stopped or slowed down by any available pharmacological treatment. A systematic analysis of genes and genetic networks involved in this neurodegenerative process is uncovering new molecular pathways with the hope of identifying potential new pharmacological targets for a disease-modifying treatment of Parkinsons disease. The goal of this presentation is to highlight some of these genes and pathways

Neuroscience

Continuing Education (CME/CE/CEU) Credits

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The Novel Neurotechnology: implications for science, medicine and society
03.19.2014 | 06:00:00 AM PT
Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD
NIH Director's Pioneer Awardee, Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience, Columbia University, Co-director of the Kavli Foundations Institute for Neural Circuitry
A Unique B Cell Derived Signature of Multiple Sclerosis and its Biologic Implications
03.19.2014 | 07:00:00 AM PT
Benjamin Greenberg, MD
Associate Professor Cain Denius Scholar in Mobility Disorders, Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center
Therapeutic Strategies for Cognitive Dysfunction in Down Syndrome
03.19.2014 | 07:00:00 AM PT
Ahmad Salehi, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School
BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science and funding overview
03.19.2014 | 08:00:00 AM PT
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T
BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science overview
03.19.2014 | 08:00:00 AM PT
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T
Age-Dependent Responses of Dendrite Structure to Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity
03.19.2014 | 09:00:00 AM PT
Kristen Harris, PhD
Associate Chair, Department of Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience , Fellow Center for Learning and Memory, University of Texas at Austin
Brain Computer Interfaces: Neurotech in the Future of Neuroscience
03.19.2014 | 09:00:00 AM PT
Lana Morrow, PhD
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.
Remyelinating the adult central nervous system: Repairing injury in MS
03.19.2014 | 09:00:00 AM PT
Ari Green, MD
Director of UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center, Director of UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center, Rachleff Endowed Professor, Associate Professor of Neurology and Opthalmology, UCSF School of Medicine
How Subtle and "Benevolent" Biases Undermine Women's Advancement in the Sciences
03.19.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
Peter Glick, PhD
Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of the Social Sciences, Professor of Psychology, Lawrence University
MS Bioscreen: From the Bedside to the Bench and Back
03.19.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, PhD, MPH
Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco
NMDA receptor regulation in health and disease
03.19.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
Michael Salter, MD, PhD, FRSC
Head and Senior Scientist of Neurosciences & Mental Health, Associate Chief of Science Strategy Research, Sick Kids Research Institute
When good neurons go bad: Dopamine neuron regulation and its disruption in schizophrenia and depression
03.19.2014 | 11:00:00 AM PT
Anthony Grace, PhD
Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh
Abeta oligomer receptor antagonists as disease-modifying Alzheimers therapeutics
03.19.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Susan Catalano, PhD
Founder and Chief Science Officer, Cognition Therapeutics, Inc.
CE
Chemogenetics: a transformational technology for neuroscience
03.19.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Bryan L. Roth, MD, PhD
Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program, Michael Hooker Chair Protein Therapeutics , Professor of Pharmacology, UNC Chapel Hill Medical School Chapel Hill
Src Regulation of Lamellipodia, Filopodia, and Substrate-Cytoskeletal Coupling in Neuronal Growth Cones
03.19.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Daniel Suter, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University
ABCA1 and APOE: Intertwined roles in Alzheimers disease
03.19.2014 | 13:00:00 PM PT
Radosveta Koldamova, MD, PhD
Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh
Engineering reproducible neural tissue from pluripotent stem cells
03.19.2014 | 13:00:00 PM PT
Stephanie Willerth, PhD
Assistant Professor, University of Victoria Engineering, Canada
Connectomics - Defining Neural Circuits to Understand Brain Function
03.20.2014 | 06:00:00 AM PT
Scott W. Emmons, PhD
Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics, Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Huntingtons Disease: Twenty years and counting
03.20.2014 | 07:00:00 AM PT
Margaret Sutherland, PhD
Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster, NIH/NINDS
CE
Tools for Mapping Brain Computations
03.20.2014 | 07:00:00 AM PT
Edward S. Boyden, PhD
Joint Professor at MIT, Synthetic Neurobiology Research Group, AT&T Career Development Associate Professor, MIT
Biomarkers, Cognition and Cognitive Reserve in Alzheimers Disease
03.20.2014 | 08:00:00 AM PT
Prashanthi Vemuri, PhD
Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic
The Human Connectome Project
03.20.2014 | 08:00:00 AM PT
David Van Essen, PhD
Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine
BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - funding overview
03.20.2014 | 09:00:00 AM PT
Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF
CME
BRAIN Initiative Panel Discussion - science and funding overview
03.20.2014 | 09:00:00 AM PT
Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF
CME
Impairments of brain network connectivity in autism
03.20.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
Ralph-Axel Mueller, PhD
Director of the Brain Development Imaging Lab, Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University
Neuroeconomy; Economic Impact of Neurodegenerative Diseases both in the US and Globally
03.20.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
Lana Morrow, PhD
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.
Neuroimaging Informatics: Distributed Resources for 'Big' Cognition
03.20.2014 | 10:00:00 AM PT
David N. Kennedy, PhD
Professor, Univ of Massachusettes Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Director of the Division of Neuroinformatics at the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative
Using brain imaging and biomarkers for diagnosis and investigation of Alzheimer's disease "The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiat
03.20.2014 | 11:00:00 AM PT
Michael Weiner, MD
Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease, Neuroimaging Initiative, Professor in Residence, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology, University of California, San Francisco
Axonal Protein Synthesis in Neurodevelopment and -degeneration
03.20.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Ulrich Hengst, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology , Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease, Columbia University
The Genetics of Alzheimer's disease
03.20.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Alison Goate, D.Phil
Samuel & Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Neurology, Dept. of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine
The potential of robotic technology as a next generation technology for neurological assessment
03.20.2014 | 12:00:00 PM PT
Stephen Scott, PhD
Professor Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queens University School of Medicine
Cholinergic modulation of visual perception in rodents
03.20.2014 | 13:00:00 PM PT
Elvire Vaucher, PhD
Full professor Ecole doptomtrie, Universit de Montral, Qubec, Canada
Neurogenesis, cognitive dysfunction and Alzheimer's disease
03.20.2014 | 13:00:00 PM PT
Orly Lazarov, PhD
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois College of Medicine
The role of high throughput sequencing in the research and diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders
03.20.2014 | 13:00:00 PM PT
Peter L Nagy, MD, PhD
Director of Next-Gen Sequencing Laboratory Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine, Associate Professor, Columbia University
Cross-talk & Developmental Programs A Key to Translational Stem Cell Biology
03.20.2014 | 14:00:00 PM PT
Evan W. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.P
Director Stem Cell Research Center & Core Facility, Professor, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Inst, Faculty Physician, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego
Disinhibition Drives Rapid Movement and Associative Motor Memory Formation in the Cerebellum
03.20.2014 | 14:00:00 PM PT
Paul Mathews, PhD
Postdoctoral research scientist, UCLA
Genetics of Parkinsons disease
03.20.2014 | 14:00:00 PM PT
Katerina Venderova, PhD
Assistant Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of the Pacific, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Neuroscience

Speakers

Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD
NIH Director's Pioneer Awardee, Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience, Columbia University, Co-director of the Kavli Foundations Institute for Neural Circuitry

Rafael Yuste is an HHMI Investigator, Professor of Biological Sciences and Neuroscience at Columbia University and Co-director of the Kavli Foundations Institute for Neural Circuitry. He obtained his M.D. at the Universidad Autonoma in Madrid. After a brief period in Brenners laboratory in Cambridge, he did his Ph.D work with Katz and Wiesel at Rockefeller University and postdoctoral research with Tank and Denk at Bell Labs. Dr. Yuste has pioneered the application of imaging techniques in neuroscience, such as calcium imaging of neuronal circuits, two-photon imaging, photostimulation using caged compounds and holographic spatial light modulation microscopy. These technical developments have resulted in several patents, two of which are commercially licensed. Yuste has obtained many awards for his work, including New York City Mayors and the Society for Neurosciences Young Investigator Awards. Finally, he has recently been involved in launching the Brain Activity Map Project, a large-scale international effort to record and manipulate the activity of every neuron in brain circuits, a role highlighted by Nature who named Yuste One of the 5 scientists to watch in 2013. Dr. Yuste and his laboratory are pursuing a reverse engineering strategy to understand the function of the cortical microcircuit, a basic element of cortex architecture.

Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF

Story Landis, Ph.D. has been Director of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) since 2003. A native of New England, Dr. Landis received her undergraduate degree from Wellesley College (1967) and her Ph.D. from Harvard University (1973). After postdoctoral work at Harvard University, she served on the faculty of the Department of Neurobiology there. In 1985, she joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, where she created the Department of Neurosciences which, under her leadership, achieved an international reputation for excellence. Throughout her research career, Dr. Landis has made fundamental contributions to the understanding of nervous system development. She has garnered many honors, is an elected fellow of the Institute of Medicine, the Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Neurological Association, and in 2002 was elected President of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Landis joined the NINDS in 1995 as Scientific Director and worked to re-engineer the Institute's intramural research programs. Between 1999 and 2000, she led the movement, together with the NIMH Scientific Director, to bring a sense of unity and common purpose to 200 neuroscience laboratories from eleven different NIH Institutes. As NINDS Director, Dr. Landis oversees an annual budget of $1.6 billion that supports research by investigators in public and private institutions across the country, as well as by scientists working in its intramural program. Together with NIMH and NIA directors, she co-chairs the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, a roadmap-like effort to support trans-NIH activities in the brain sciences. In 2007, Dr. Landis was named Chair of the NIH Stem Cell Task Force.Thomas R. Insel, M.D., is Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the component of the National Institutes of Health charged with generating the knowledge needed to understand, treat, and prevent mental disorders. His tenure at NIMH has been distinguished by groundbreaking findings in the areas of practical clinical trials, autism research, and the role of genetics in mental illnesses. Prior to his appointment as NIMH Director in the Fall 2002, Dr. Insel was Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University. There, he was founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, one of the largest science and technology centers funded by the National Science Foundation and, concurrently, director of an NIH-funded Center for Autism Research. From 1994 to 1999, he was Director of the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center in Atlanta. While at Emory, Dr. Insel continued the line of research he had initiated at NIMH studying the neurobiology of complex social behaviors. He has published over 250 scientific articles and four books, including the Neurobiology of Parental Care (with Michael Numan) in 2003. Dr. Insel has served on numerous academic, scientific, and professional committees and boards. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and is a recipient of several awards including the Outstanding Service Award from the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Insel graduated from the combined B.A.-M.D. program at Boston University in 1974. He did his internship at Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and his residency at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute at the University of California, San Francisco.Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DSO as a program manager in 2013. At DARPA, Dr. Sanchez will explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Before coming to DARPA, Dr. Sanchez was an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience at the University of Miami, and a faculty member of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. He directed the Neuroprosthetics Research Group, where he oversaw development of neural-interface medical treatments and neurotechnology for treating paralysis and stroke, and for deep brain stimulation for movement disorders, Tourettes syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Dr. Sanchez has developed new methods for signal analysis and processing techniques for studying the unknown aspects of neural coding and functional neurophysiology. His experience covers in vivo electrophysiology for brain-machine interface design in animals and humans where he studied the activity of single neurons, local field potentials and electrocorticogram in the cerebral cortex and from deep brain structures of the motor and limbic system. He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed papers, holds seven patents in neuroprosthetic design and authored a book on the design of brain-machine interfaces. He has served as a reviewer for the NIH Neurotechnology Study Section, DoDs Spinal Cord Injury Research Program and the Wellcome Trust, and as an associate editor of multiple journals of biomedical engineering and neurophysiology. Dr. Sanchez holds Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Engineering degrees in Biomedical Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Science, all from the University of Florida.Dr. John C. Wingfield is the assistant director for Biological Sciences (BIO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Wingfield's research has covered a wide spectrum of biology from molecular and organismal to environmental and ecological scales. He joined NSF as division director for Integrative Organismal Systems in September 2010 from the University of California, Davis. Wingfield is a distinguished scientist and active researcher with a strong record of scholarly scientific publication and leadership experience. His research focuses on neural pathways for environmental signals affecting seasonality in birds and their mechanisms of coping with environmental stress. His research also interfaces with how animals deal with global climate change, endocrine disruption and conservation biology. Wingfield has delivered numerous invited lectures, served on several editorial boards, and held positions as associate editor and/or editor-in-chief for major journals in his fields. He has received many honors from his peers and served as president of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. He also has an extensive record of service to NSF and scientific advisory boards. Prior to joining NSF in 2010, Wingfield was the chair for the department of zoology at the University of Washington from 1999 to 2003, and has held an Endowed Chair in Physiology at UC-Davis since 2007. Wingfield received his Bachelor of Science degree in zoology from the University of Sheffield and a Ph.D. in zoology and comparative endocrinology from the University College of North Wales.

Story Landis, PhD, Thomas R. Insel, MD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, John C. Wingfield
Story Landis, PhD Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Thomas R. Insel, MD Director, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA John C. Wingfield Assistant Director of Biological Sciences (BIO), National Science Foundation, NSF

Story Landis, Ph.D. has been Director of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) since 2003. A native of New England, Dr. Landis received her undergraduate degree from Wellesley College (1967) and her Ph.D. from Harvard University (1973). After postdoctoral work at Harvard University, she served on the faculty of the Department of Neurobiology there. In 1985, she joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, where she created the Department of Neurosciences which, under her leadership, achieved an international reputation for excellence. Throughout her research career, Dr. Landis has made fundamental contributions to the understanding of nervous system development. She has garnered many honors, is an elected fellow of the Institute of Medicine, the Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Neurological Association, and in 2002 was elected President of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Landis joined the NINDS in 1995 as Scientific Director and worked to re-engineer the Institute's intramural research programs. Between 1999 and 2000, she led the movement, together with the NIMH Scientific Director, to bring a sense of unity and common purpose to 200 neuroscience laboratories from eleven different NIH Institutes. As NINDS Director, Dr. Landis oversees an annual budget of $1.6 billion that supports research by investigators in public and private institutions across the country, as well as by scientists working in its intramural program. Together with NIMH and NIA directors, she co-chairs the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, a roadmap-like effort to support trans-NIH activities in the brain sciences. In 2007, Dr. Landis was named Chair of the NIH Stem Cell Task Force.Thomas R. Insel, M.D., is Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the component of the National Institutes of Health charged with generating the knowledge needed to understand, treat, and prevent mental disorders. His tenure at NIMH has been distinguished by groundbreaking findings in the areas of practical clinical trials, autism research, and the role of genetics in mental illnesses. Prior to his appointment as NIMH Director in the Fall 2002, Dr. Insel was Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University. There, he was founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, one of the largest science and technology centers funded by the National Science Foundation and, concurrently, director of an NIH-funded Center for Autism Research. From 1994 to 1999, he was Director of the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center in Atlanta. While at Emory, Dr. Insel continued the line of research he had initiated at NIMH studying the neurobiology of complex social behaviors. He has published over 250 scientific articles and four books, including the Neurobiology of Parental Care (with Michael Numan) in 2003. Dr. Insel has served on numerous academic, scientific, and professional committees and boards. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and is a recipient of several awards including the Outstanding Service Award from the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Insel graduated from the combined B.A.-M.D. program at Boston University in 1974. He did his internship at Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and his residency at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute at the University of California, San Francisco.Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DSO as a program manager in 2013. At DARPA, Dr. Sanchez will explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Before coming to DARPA, Dr. Sanchez was an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience at the University of Miami, and a faculty member of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. He directed the Neuroprosthetics Research Group, where he oversaw development of neural-interface medical treatments and neurotechnology for treating paralysis and stroke, and for deep brain stimulation for movement disorders, Tourettes syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Dr. Sanchez has developed new methods for signal analysis and processing techniques for studying the unknown aspects of neural coding and functional neurophysiology. His experience covers in vivo electrophysiology for brain-machine interface design in animals and humans where he studied the activity of single neurons, local field potentials and electrocorticogram in the cerebral cortex and from deep brain structures of the motor and limbic system. He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed papers, holds seven patents in neuroprosthetic design and authored a book on the design of brain-machine interfaces. He has served as a reviewer for the NIH Neurotechnology Study Section, DoDs Spinal Cord Injury Research Program and the Wellcome Trust, and as an associate editor of multiple journals of biomedical engineering and neurophysiology. Dr. Sanchez holds Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Engineering degrees in Biomedical Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Science, all from the University of Florida.Dr. John C. Wingfield is the assistant director for Biological Sciences (BIO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Wingfield's research has covered a wide spectrum of biology from molecular and organismal to environmental and ecological scales. He joined NSF as division director for Integrative Organismal Systems in September 2010 from the University of California, Davis. Wingfield is a distinguished scientist and active researcher with a strong record of scholarly scientific publication and leadership experience. His research focuses on neural pathways for environmental signals affecting seasonality in birds and their mechanisms of coping with environmental stress. His research also interfaces with how animals deal with global climate change, endocrine disruption and conservation biology. Wingfield has delivered numerous invited lectures, served on several editorial boards, and held positions as associate editor and/or editor-in-chief for major journals in his fields. He has received many honors from his peers and served as president of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. He also has an extensive record of service to NSF and scientific advisory boards. Prior to joining NSF in 2010, Wingfield was the chair for the department of zoology at the University of Washington from 1999 to 2003, and has held an Endowed Chair in Physiology at UC-Davis since 2007. Wingfield received his Bachelor of Science degree in zoology from the University of Sheffield and a Ph.D. in zoology and comparative endocrinology from the University College of North Wales.

Michael Weiner, MD
Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease, Neuroimaging Initiative, Professor in Residence, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

Michael Weiner, MD, is a Professor in Residence in Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco. He is Principle Investigator of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, which is the largest observational study in the world concerning Alzheimer's Disease. He is the former Director of the Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIND) at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. After graduating from the Johns Hopkins University in 1961, He obtained his M.D, from SUNY Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, New York in 1965, and he completed his internship and residency in Medicine from Mt. Sinai Hospital in 1967. From 1967-1968, Dr. Weiner completed a residency and clinical fellowship in Metabolism from Yale-New Haven Medical Center. In 1970, he completed a research fellowship in Nephrology from Yale University School of Medicine and a research fellowship in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin Institute for Enzyme Research in 1972, followed by a joint appointment in the Department of Medicine, Renal Section from the University of Wisconsin Institute in 1972. In 1974 he became an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at Stanford University, and in 1980 he became an Associate Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at UCSF. In 1983, he established the Magnetic Resonance Unit at the San Francisco VA Medical Center, which became the Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases in 2000. In 1990, he became a Professor of Radiology, Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology at UCSF. During the past 25 years he has worked to develop and optimized the use of MRI, PET, and blood based biomarker methods to diagnose Alzheimers disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Also, Dr. Weiners research focuses on monitoring effects of treatment to slow progressions in Alzheimers disease, and detecting Alzheimers disease early in patients who are not demented, but risk subsequent development of dementia. He is the Principle Investigator of the Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative which has enrolled over 1500 subjects (including controls, MCI, and AD) at 68 sites across the USA and Canada for cognitive testing, MRI, PET, and lumbar puncture. He has also launched The Brain Initiative, which is a web-based registry for recruiting, screening, and longitudinally monitoring subjects for neuroscience studies of all types. Dr. Weiner has 649 published articles and he has written 70 book chapters.

Ulrich Hengst, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology , Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease, Columbia University

Dr. Ulrich Hengst studied biochemistry at the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, and conducted his graduate research at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel, Switzerland, in the group of Prof. Denis Monard. In 2003 he received his PhD from the University of Basel. For his postdoctoral training, Dr. Hengst joined the laboratory of Samie R. Jaffrey, MD, PhD at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY. In Dr. Jaffreys group, he investigated the role of axonally localized mRNAs for axonal development leading to the identification of the first examples of specific mRNAs that are translated in axons in response to extracellular signaling molecules and that mediate growth cone collapse and axon elongation, respectively. In 2009, Dr. Hengst joined the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology and the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease and the Aging Brain at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, NY, as an Assistant Professor. He has successfully established new research projects addressing the role of local protein synthesis in Alzheimers disease and neurodevelopment.

Elvire Vaucher, PhD
Full professor Ecole doptomtrie, Universit de Montral, Qubec, Canada

Dr Vaucher obtained her PhD Neurosciences at Universit Paris VI. CNRS UA 641, Paris / Institut Neurologique de Montral, Qubec. She has completed two post-doctoral formations in the field of the involvement of the cholnergic deficit in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of her research group is to determine the role of neurotransmitters in the visual processing, especially the role of neuromodulators such as acetylcholine in modifying the cortical representation of specific stimuli and the cortical plasticity. This project will extend the basic knowledge of how the visual stimuli are integrated by the cortical networks (including learning, memory and attentional processes) and will permit to use pharmacological agents as cognitive and/or sensory enhancers to facilitate sight recovery and cortical plasticity.

Paul Mathews, PhD
Postdoctoral research scientist, UCLA

Dr. Paul J. Mathews received his bachelors degree from the University of Oregon where he studied invertebrate behavioral plasticity in the lab of Dr. Nathan Tublitz. He received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Texas at Austin under the mentorship of Dr. Nace Golding. Dr. Mathews work focused on understanding how the biophysical properties of specific voltage-gated ion channels in an auditory brainstem nuclei contribute to their capacity to make sub-millisecond computations necessary for low frequency sound localization. For the past several years Dr. Mathews has been working at UCLA under the mentorship of Dr. Tom Otis where he is currently working to uncover the cerebellar circuit mechanisms that underlie motor learning and memory. To do this Dr. Mathews is utilizing a multifaceted approach that includes both in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, advanced optics, histology, and behavioral manipulations to make links between cerebellar circuit activity and motor output in rodent models. He is currently on the job market looking for a tenured track assistant professor position.

Ralph-Axel Mueller, PhD
Director of the Brain Development Imaging Lab, Professor of Psychology, San Diego State University

Dr. Ralph-Axel Mueller is Professor of Psychology at San Diego State University (San Diego, CA). He received his Ph.D. from the Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University of Frankfurt (Germany) and received postdoctoral training with Dr. Harry Chugani at Childrens Hospital of Michigan. Over the past twenty years, Dr. Mueller has applied functional and anatomical imaging techniques to the study of brain development in typical children and adolescents, as well as those with developmental disorders. While his early work focused on the implementation of positron emission tomography in children with epilepsy and tumors in preparation for neurosurgery and on the investigation of lesion-induced neuroplasticity, work in the past 15 years has been dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging in autism. His group was among the first to use functional MRI and subsequently functional connectivity MRI in the study of brain network abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders. More recently, work in his laboratory has expanded to include other imaging techniques, such as diffusion tensor imaging (for the study of anatomical connectivity), as well as anatomical brain volumetrics and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Dr. Mueller laboratory (www.sci.sdsu.edu/~amueller/web/BDIL) has been continuously funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NINDS, NIDCD, NIMH) and other agencies since 2001.

Alison Goate, D.Phil
Samuel & Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Neurology, Dept. of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine

Alison M Goate is the Samuel & Mae S Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA). Dr Goate studied for her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of Bristol (UK) and received her graduate training at Oxford University (UK). She performed postdoctoral studies with Professor Theodore Puck, Professor Louis Lim and Dr John Hardy before receiving a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to support her independent research program at St Mary's Hospital Medical School in London. In 1991, Dr Goate and colleagues reported the first mutation linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21. The mutation was found to be linked to inherited cases of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In 1992, Dr Goate moved to Washington University as an Associate Professor in Genetics and Psychiatry. Dr Goate and colleagues have since identified mutations in four other genes, including two that cause Alzheimer's disease and two that cause the related dementia frontotemporal dementia. In addition to her work on dementia, Dr Goate's laboratory also studies the genetics of alcohol and nicotine dependence. Dr Goate has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association, the Senior Investigator Award from the Metropolitan Life Foundation, the St Louis Academy of Science Innovation Award and the Carl and Gerty Cori Faculty Achievement Award at Washington University. Dr Goate has been a member of many scientific Review Boards and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals.

Peter L Nagy, MD, PhD
Director of Next-Gen Sequencing Laboratory Laboratory of Personalized Genomic Medicine, Associate Professor, Columbia University

Peter L. Nagy is a biochemist and a physician, board certified in anatomic and molecular genetic pathology.

Dr. Nagy's research focuses on the role of transcriptional processing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. He developed S. pombe and M. musculus models for Ataxia-Oculomotor-Apraxia type 2 (AOA2) caused by mutations in the human ortholog of the yeast RNA helicase Sen1, Senataxin (SETX). Using these models they are working to define the pathomechanism of SETX mediated neurodegenerative disorders. They are also investigating the pathogenesis of ALS caused by C9orf72 expansions and search for novel ALS causing or modifying genetic variants. 

In Dr. Nagy's research, he combines the tools of classical biochemistry and genetics with genomics, most importantly next-gen sequencing for mutation discovery, transcriptome analysis and the identification of novel protein RNA interactions.

His clinical interest is the development and use of genome-scale sequencing assays in the clinical diagnosis of constitutional disorders and cancer such as :

    * Mitochondrial Genome Sequencing Test

    * Columbia Combined Genetic Panel (1300 genes most commonly associated with genetic disorders)

    * Whole Exome Sequencing Tests for Constitutional Disorders and Cancer.

Katerina Venderova, PhD
Assistant Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of the Pacific, Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Dr. Katerina Venderova obtained her master's and doctorate degrees in pharmacy, and her PhD in Toxicology from Charles University in the Czech Republic. She then received a fellowship from the Parkinson Society Canada and pursued her postdoctoral training at Toronto Western Research Institute (2 years), and subsequently at University of Ottawa in Canada (5 years), where she studied genetics of Parkinson's disease, mechanisms of neuronal death and cell signaling in the basal ganglia. Dr. Venderova joined Pacific in 2011.

Margaret Sutherland, PhD
Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster, NIH/NINDS

Dr. Margaret Sutherland joined the NINDS in 2007 and serves as a Program Director in the Neurodegeneration Cluster at NINDS. She currently oversees research grant portfolios and programs in: i) Huntington's Disease; ii) Frontotemporal Dementia and iii) basic and clinical studies supporting the genetics, protein flux, mitochondrial dynamics, synuclein biology and stem cell based-research associated with Parkinson's Disease. Dr. Sutherland manages the CINAPS contract which is designed to support pre-clinical validation of therapeutic targets for Parkinson's Disease. She also oversees consortia focused on the development and utilization of induced pluripotent stem cell resources for advancement of basic and translational research in neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Sutherland received her undergraduate degree in Microbiology and Immunology from the University of Western Ontario and her Ph.D. in Molecular Neuroscience from the Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), Cambridge UK. She completed her postdoctoral training with Dr. Jeffrey Noebels, in the Department of Neurology, at the Baylor College of Medicine where she developed transgenic mouse models of absence seizures (overexpression of voltage-gated K+ channels) and enhanced astroglial glutamate transport. Prior to joining the NINDS, Dr. Sutherland was a faculty member in the Center for Neuroscience Research at the Children's National Medical Center (CNMC), where she directed NIH-funded research programs on excitotoxicity mechanisms in neurodegeneration and epilepsy and served as director of the CNMC Transgenic Core facility.

Stephen Scott, PhD
Professor Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queens University School of Medicine

Dr. Stephen Scott is a professor in the Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences at Queen's University. He is also a member of the Centre for Neuroscience Studies and the CIHR Group in Sensory-Motor Systems. He graduated from the University of Waterloo in Systems Designs Engineering for his undergraduate degree and a M.A.Sc. with Dr. D.A. Winter. He then did a Ph.D. with Dr. Gerry Loeb at Queens University in the Department of Physiology. After that he went to the Universit de Montral for his postdoctoral training in the Department of Physiology with Dr. John Kalaska from 1993 to 1995. His first faculty position was as a chercheur adjoint in the Department of Physiology at Universit de Montral in 1995. He moved his lab to Queen's University in 1997.

Orly Lazarov, PhD
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Illinois College of Medicine

r. Lazarov started her scientific career as a graduate student at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. There, she joined the research group of Professor Michal Schwartz, where she studied the cross talk between the immune system and the central nervous system in relation to nerve trauma. She was granted The Feinberg Graduate School Fellowship of Distinction for Outstanding Achievement in Studies and Research and the Feinberg Graduate School Award for Distinguished Ph.D. Students. After graduation she joined the research group of Professor Sangram S. Sisodia at the University of Chicago. Dr. Lazarov studied and characterized multiple aspects of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology. Her pioneering studies showed that in addition to genetics, environmental factors play a major role in the formation of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Lazarov joined the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2005, where she established a research group that studies neurogenesis and plasticity in aging and in Alzheimer's disease.

Lana Morrow, PhD
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

Dr. Morrow earned a doctorate degree in cognitive neuroscience from La Sapienza University in Rome, Italy, and went on to train at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City at the invitation of professor Melvin Yahr. While working at the neurology department of Mount Sinai, she conducted studies using EEG-based brain mapping techniques with Parkinsons patients. Afterwards she received further education and training in Clinical Neuropsychology under Dr. Yaakov Stern at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. As a Clinical Neuropsychologist, she has over 20 years experience assessing and treating adults and children with various learning and neurological issues, specializing in the treatment of learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder and the differential diagnosis of complex brain disorders. As a neuroscientist, she used visual evoked potentials and other neuroimaging modalities to study brain functioning, completing successful research collaborations with major universities in Europe and the United States. Most recently, Dr. Morrow developed a dry electrode wireless EEG headset and brain-computer interface that incorporates advancements from different branches of science and technology. Dr. Morrows vision is to help improve the quality of life for children and adults using simple, non-invasive systems. One of her companies, THINK Interfaces, Inc., was created to provide patients with non-invasive, non-pharmacological methods for the diagnosis and remediation of patients with ADD/ADHD, Parkinsons Disease, Alzheimers Disease, and age-related cognitive capacity, memory and focus deficits. Her system is currently in clinical trials on children with ADD/ADHD. Dr. Morrow collaborates with top scientists and engineers from leading universities around the world with the aim of conducting multidisciplinary clinical research and the development of hardware and software products for the purpose of delivering tangible benefits to millions around the globe.

Evan W. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.P
Director Stem Cell Research Center & Core Facility, Professor, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Inst, Faculty Physician, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego

Evan Y. Snyder earned his M.D. and Ph.D. (in neuroscience) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1980 as a member of NIH's Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). He had also studied psychology and linguistics at the University of Oxford. After moving to Boston in 1980, he completed residencies in pediatrics and neurology as well as a clinical fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Children's Hospital-Boston, Harvard Medical School. He also served as Chief Resident in Medicine (1984-85) and Chief Resident in Neurology (1987) at Children's Hospital-Boston. In 1989, he became an attending physician in the Department of Pediatrics (Division of Newborn Medicine) and Department of Neurology at Children's Hospital-Boston, Harvard Medical School. From 1985-91, concurrent with his clinical activities, he conducted postdoctoral research as a fellow in the Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School. In 1992, Dr. Snyder was appointed an instructor in neurology (neonatology) at Harvard Medical School and was promoted to assistant professor in 1996. He maintained lab spaces in both Children's Hospital-Boston and at Harvard Institutes of Medicine/Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2003, Dr. Snyder was recruited to Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute as Professor and Director of the Program in Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology. He then inaugurated the Stem Cell Research Center (serving as its founding director) and initiated the Southern California Stem Cell Consortium. Dr. Snyder is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics (FAAP). He also received training in Philosophy and Linguistics at Oxford University.

Prashanthi Vemuri, PhD
Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic

Dr. Vemuri is an Assistant Professor at the Aging and Dementia Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic Rochester. She has a Masters and Doctorate from the Department of Electrical Engineering at University of Utah, Salt Lake City with a major in Medical Imaging. She completed a fellowship with Dr. Clifford Jack at the Mayo Clinic in imaging of neurodegenerative diseases. She is a recipient of the NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence grant from the NIA, Alzheimers Association New Investigator grant award and was recently awarded the AFAR-GE healthcare junior investigator award for excellence in aging and imaging research. Dr. Vemuris areas of research are developing and validating biomarkers to improve the understanding and management of Alzheimers disease and related disorders and utilize biomarkers to improve our understanding of cognitive reserve i.e. the disconnect between pathology and cognitive performance in individuals.

David Van Essen, PhD
Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Van Essen is currently Edison Professor and Head of the Anatomy & Neurobiology Department at Washington University in St. Louis. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience, founding chair of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, and President of the Society for Neuroscience. He is a fellow of the AAAS and has received the Peter Raven Lifetime Achievement Award from the St. Louis Academy of Science and the Krieg Cortical Discoverer Award from the Cajal Club. Dr. Van Essen received his undergraduate degree in Chemistry in 1967 from Caltech and his graduate degree in neurobiology in 1971 from Harvard. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard under Drs. David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel and did additional postdoctoral work in Norway and England before returning to Caltech in 1976. He was a faculty member in the Division of Biology at Caltech until 1992, during which time he served as Executive Officer for Neurobiology (1982-1989) and Option Representative for the Computation and Neural Systems program (1986-1991). In 1992 he became Edison Professor of Neurobiology and Head of the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Van Essen is internationally known for his research on how the brain organizes and processes visual information. He has made extensive contributions to the understanding of how the brain perceives shape, motion and color and how attention affects neural activity. His work has helped to demonstrate that the brain contains dozens of different areas involved in vision and that these areas are interconnected by hundreds of distinct neural pathways. He and his colleagues have developed powerful new techniques in computerized brain mapping to analyze these visual areas in humans as well as nonhuman primates. This work includes the continued development of an integrated suite of software tools for surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex. These methods are applied to the analysis of cortical structure and function in humans, monkeys and rodents. A broad objective is to develop probabilistic surface-based atlases that accurately convey commonalities as well as differences between individuals.

Edward S. Boyden, PhD
Joint Professor at MIT, Synthetic Neurobiology Research Group, AT&T Career Development Associate Professor, MIT

Professor Boyden leads the MIT Synthetic Neurobiology research group, which develops tools for mapping, controlling, observing, and building Brain Circuits. His research group has invented a suite of "optogenetic" tools that are now in use by thousands of research groups around the world for activating and silencing neurons with light. Boyden was named to the "Top 35 Innovators Under the Age of 35" by Technology Review in 2006, and to the "Top 20 Brains Under Age 40" by Discover magazine in 2008. He has received the Gabbay Award, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Pioneer Award and Transformative Research Award, the Society for Neuroscience Research Award for Innovation in Neuroscience, the NSF Career Award, the Paul Allen Distinguished Investigator Award, and the New York Stem Cell Robertson Investigator Award. In 2010, his work was recognized as the "Method of the Year" by the journal Nature Methods. Most recently he shared the 2013 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize for outstanding contributions to European neuroscience-the largest neuroscience prize in the world

Scott W. Emmons, PhD
Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics, Professor of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Dr. Emmons is the Siegfried Ullmann Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neuroscience at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Emmons received his PhD from Stanford University. He carried out postdoctoral work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Embryology, Baltimore, and at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Emmons has been studying the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans for over 30 years. Initially he analyzed genome structure. Later he turned his attention to developmental studies, focusing on development of the C. elegans male as a model for understanding the genetic specification and evolution of morphology. This work led to the identification of a number of regulatory genes and contributed to the understanding of genetic specification of cell fate, including patterning of neurotransmitters in the nervous system. Current focus is on male behavior and the structure, development, and genetic specification of the nervous system. The laboratory has recently determined the wiring diagram of the nervous system of the adult male. This is one of the first results in the new field of connectomics. A connectome is a complete map of a nervous system, including all the synaptic connections. Currently the laboratory is interested in studying the development of connectivity during growth and in identifying the genes that specify individual connections.

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T

Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D. is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School, a Professor of Computational Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. Brown is the Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the co-director of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology and an associate director of M.I.T.'s Institute for Medical Engineering & Science.[1] Brown also works as a doctor in the department of anesthesiology, critical care and pain medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.[2] In 2007, Brown was one of the recipients of the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award.[3] Brown is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.Bill Newsome is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Stetson University and a Ph.D. in biology from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Newsome is a leading investigator in systems and cognitive neuroscience. He has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception and simple forms of decision making. Among his honors are the Rank Prize in Optoelectronics, the Spencer Award, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize of Tel Aviv University, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society, and the Champalimaud Vision Award. His distinguished lectureships include the 13th Annual Marr Lecture at the University of Cambridge the 9th Annual Brenda Milner Lecture at McGill University, and most recently, the Distinguished Visiting Scholar lectures at the Kavli Institute of Brain and Mind, UCSD. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2000, and to the American Philosophical Society in 2011. Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DSO as a program manager in 2013. At DARPA, Dr. Sanchez will explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Before coming to DARPA, Dr. Sanchez was an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience at the University of Miami, and a faculty member of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. He directed the Neuroprosthetics Research Group, where he oversaw development of neural-interface medical treatments and neurotechnology for treating paralysis and stroke, and for deep brain stimulation for movement disorders, Tourettes syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Dr. Sanchez has developed new methods for signal analysis and processing techniques for studying the unknown aspects of neural coding and functional neurophysiology. His experience covers in vivo electrophysiology for brain-machine interface design in animals and humans where he studied the activity of single neurons, local field potentials and electrocorticogram in the cerebral cortex and from deep brain structures of the motor and limbic system. He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed papers, holds seven patents in neuroprosthetic design and authored a book on the design of brain-machine interfaces. He has served as a reviewer for the NIH Neurotechnology Study Section, DoDs Spinal Cord Injury Research Program and the Wellcome Trust, and as an associate editor of multiple journals of biomedical engineering and neurophysiology. Dr. Sanchez holds Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Engineering degrees in Biomedical Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Science, all from the University of Florida.Terrence Sejnowski is a pioneer in computational neuroscience and his goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. His laboratory uses both experimental and modeling techniques to study the biophysical properties of synapses and neurons and the population dynamics of large networks of neurons. New computational models and new analytical tools have been developed to understand how the brain represents the world and how new representations are formed through learning algorithms for changing the synaptic strengths of connections between neurons. He has published over 300 scientific papers and 12 books, including The Computational Brain, with Patricia Churchland. He received his PhD in physics from Princeton University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. He was on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University and he now holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies and is also a Professor of Biology at the University of California, San Diego, where he is co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation and co-director of the NSF Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center. He is the President of the Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) Foundation, which organizes an annual conference attended by over 1000 researchers in machine learning and neural computation and is the founding editor-in-chief of Neural Computation published by the MIT Press. An investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, he is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has received many honors, including the NSF Young Investigators Award, the Wright Prize for interdisciplinary research from the Harvey Mudd College, the Neural Network Pioneer Award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Hebb Prize from the International Neural Network Society. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2008, to the National Academy of Sciences in 2010, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He is one of only 10 living persons to be a member of all 3 national academies.

Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD, William Newsome, PhD, Justin Sanchez, PhD, Terrence J Sejnowski, PhD
Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD Warren M. Zapol Prof. of Anaesthesia Harvard Medical School, Prof. of Computational Neuroscience MIT, Director, Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory, Anesthetist, Massachusetts General Hospital William Newsome, PhD Director of Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Harman Family Provostial Professor, and Professor of Neurobiology and, by courtesy, of Psychology, Stanford School of Medicine Justin Sanchez, PhD Program Manager of the Defense Sciences Office, DARPA T

Emery N. Brown, M.D., Ph.D. is the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School, a Professor of Computational Neuroscience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. Brown is the Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the co-director of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology and an associate director of M.I.T.'s Institute for Medical Engineering & Science.[1] Brown also works as a doctor in the department of anesthesiology, critical care and pain medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.[2] In 2007, Brown was one of the recipients of the National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award.[3] Brown is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.Bill Newsome is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Stetson University and a Ph.D. in biology from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Newsome is a leading investigator in systems and cognitive neuroscience. He has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception and simple forms of decision making. Among his honors are the Rank Prize in Optoelectronics, the Spencer Award, the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the Dan David Prize of Tel Aviv University, the Karl Spencer Lashley Award of the American Philosophical Society, and the Champalimaud Vision Award. His distinguished lectureships include the 13th Annual Marr Lecture at the University of Cambridge the 9th Annual Brenda Milner Lecture at McGill University, and most recently, the Distinguished Visiting Scholar lectures at the Kavli Institute of Brain and Mind, UCSD. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in 2000, and to the American Philosophical Society in 2011. Dr. Justin Sanchez joined DSO as a program manager in 2013. At DARPA, Dr. Sanchez will explore neurotechnology, brain science and systems neurobiology. Before coming to DARPA, Dr. Sanchez was an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience at the University of Miami, and a faculty member of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis. He directed the Neuroprosthetics Research Group, where he oversaw development of neural-interface medical treatments and neurotechnology for treating paralysis and stroke, and for deep brain stimulation for movement disorders, Tourettes syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Dr. Sanchez has developed new methods for signal analysis and processing techniques for studying the unknown aspects of neural coding and functional neurophysiology. His experience covers in vivo electrophysiology for brain-machine interface design in animals and humans where he studied the activity of single neurons, local field potentials and electrocorticogram in the cerebral cortex and from deep brain structures of the motor and limbic system. He has published more than 75 peer-reviewed papers, holds seven patents in neuroprosthetic design and authored a book on the design of brain-machine interfaces. He has served as a reviewer for the NIH Neurotechnology Study Section, DoDs Spinal Cord Injury Research Program and the Wellcome Trust, and as an associate editor of multiple journals of biomedical engineering and neurophysiology. Dr. Sanchez holds Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Engineering degrees in Biomedical Engineering, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Science, all from the University of Florida.Terrence Sejnowski is a pioneer in computational neuroscience and his goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. His laboratory uses both experimental and modeling techniques to study the biophysical properties of synapses and neurons and the population dynamics of large networks of neurons. New computational models and new analytical tools have been developed to understand how the brain represents the world and how new representations are formed through learning algorithms for changing the synaptic strengths of connections between neurons. He has published over 300 scientific papers and 12 books, including The Computational Brain, with Patricia Churchland. He received his PhD in physics from Princeton University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School. He was on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University and he now holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies and is also a Professor of Biology at the University of California, San Diego, where he is co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation and co-director of the NSF Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center. He is the President of the Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) Foundation, which organizes an annual conference attended by over 1000 researchers in machine learning and neural computation and is the founding editor-in-chief of Neural Computation published by the MIT Press. An investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, he is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has received many honors, including the NSF Young Investigators Award, the Wright Prize for interdisciplinary research from the Harvey Mudd College, the Neural Network Pioneer Award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Hebb Prize from the International Neural Network Society. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2008, to the National Academy of Sciences in 2010, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He is one of only 10 living persons to be a member of all 3 national academies.

Lana Morrow, PhD
Founder and CEO, Think Interfaces, Inc.

Dr. Morrow earned a doctorate degree in cognitive neuroscience from La Sapienza University in Rome, Italy, and went on to train at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City at the invitation of professor Melvin Yahr. While working at the neurology department of Mount Sinai, she conducted studies using EEG-based brain mapping techniques with Parkinsons patients. Afterwards she received further education and training in Clinical Neuropsychology under Dr. Yaakov Stern at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.

As a Clinical Neuropsychologist, she has over 20 years experience assessing and treating adults and children with various learning and neurological issues, specializing in the treatment of learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder and the differential diagnosis of complex brain disorders. As a neuroscientist, she used visual evoked potentials and other neuroimaging modalities to study brain functioning, completing successful research collaborations with major universities in Europe and the United States.

Most recently, Dr. Morrow developed a dry electrode wireless EEG headset and brain-computer interface that incorporates advancements from different branches of science and technology. Dr. Morrows vision is to help improve the quality of life for children and adults using simple, non-invasive systems. One of her companies, THINK Interfaces, Inc., was created to provide patients with non-invasive, non-pharmacological methods for the diagnosis and remediation of patients with ADD/ADHD, Parkinsons Disease, Alzheimers Disease, and age-related cognitive capacity, memory and focus deficits. Her system is currently in clinical trials on children with ADD/ADHD. Dr. Morrow collaborates with top scientists and engineers from leading universities around the world with the aim of conducting multidisciplinary clinical research and the development of hardware and software products for the purpose of delivering tangible benefits to millions around the globe.

Anthony Grace, PhD
Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology Department of Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Anthony A. Grace is a Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience and a Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, PA. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University School of Medicine with Dr. Benjamin S. Bunney and had postdoctoral training with Dr. Rodolfo Llinas in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Grace has been involved in translational research related to the dopamine system for over 30 years. His early work pioneered the mode of action of antipsychotic drugs, and the identification and characterization of dopamine-containing neurons, and was the first to provide a means to quantify their activity state and pattern in a way that is the standard in the literature. His current work involves novel treatments for schizophrenia and its prevention, the role of dopamine in anhedonia and affective disorders, and the mode of action of ketamine and novel antidepressant drugs. Dr. Grace has received several awards for his research, including the Paul Janssen Schizophrenia Research Award and the Lilly Basic Scientist Award from the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology, the Efron Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, as well as a NIMH MERIT award, a Distinguished Investigator award from the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression, the Judith Silver Memorial Investigator Award from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and appointment as a Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a past member of the governing council of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is on the editorial board fornumerous leading journals in the field.

Kristen Harris, PhD
Associate Chair, Department of Neuroscience, Professor of Neuroscience , Fellow Center for Learning and Memory, University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Harris's goal is to elucidate the structural components involved in the cell biology of learning and memory. She has quantified the basic ultrastructure of synapses in several brain regions using reconstruction from serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM). Her focus has been on dendritic spines because they are the major postsynaptic targets of excitatory axons throughout the brain and because their structure and composition serve both synaptic plasticity and stabilizing homeostatic mechanisms. She has developed and maintains an NIH-supported educational website on the ultrastructure of synapses. Dr. Kristen Harris received her PhD in Neuroscience in 1982 from the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine in Rootstown Ohio with Dr. Timothy Teyler, when she established postnatal day 15 as the earliest age to express enduring long-term potentiation. In 1984 she completed postdoctoral research in serial section transmission electron microscopy with Dr. Dennis Landis at Harvard Medical School and Dr. John Stevens at the University of Toronto. She then became a member of the faculty in Neurology at the Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital, Boston where she remained until 1999. In 1999 she moved as tenured full professor to Boston University where she helped to establish an inter-departmental Program in Neuroscience. In 2002 she became a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar at the Medical College of Georgia where she established the Synapses and Cognitive Neuroscience Center and initiated the Human Brain Laboratory and recruited Dr. Sergei Kirov as its director. In 2006, she was recruited to the new Center for Learning and Memory at the University of Austin at Texas where she is currently Professor in Neurobiology.

Daniel Suter, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University

Dr. Daniel Suter studied Biology at the ETH Zurich in Switzerland, receiving an MS degree in Biological Sciences in 1988. After pursuing additional training in Biology and Chemistry Education at the ETH Zurich, he conducted graduate research on neuronal cell adhesion molecules with Prof. Peter Sonderegger in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Zurich.  After receiving a PhD in Biochemistry in 1995, he joined the laboratory of Prof. Paul Forscher at Yale University as a Postdoctoral fellow with support from the Swiss National Science Foundation and the Roche Research Foundation. During his time at Yale University, Dr. Suter made significant contributions to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of neuronal growth cone motility and guidance, using quantitative high-resolution live cell imaging techniques. For example, he provided the first direct experimental evidence that support the model of substrate-cytoskeletal coupling during growth cone migration.

In 2003, he started his own lab at Purdue University as an Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, continuing to unravel the basic mechanisms that control the directional movements of neuronal growth cones. His independent research program has focused on (1) the role of microtubules in growth cone guidance, (2) the dynamics and function of Src tyrosine kinase in growth cones, (3) the role of reactive oxygen species in controlling the neuronal cytoskeleton, and (4) the biomechanics of growth cones. Since 2009, Dr. Suter is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences in the Department of Biological Sciences at Purdue University.

Michael Salter, MD, PhD, FRSC
Head and Senior Scientist of Neurosciences & Mental Health, Associate Chief of Science Strategy Research, Sick Kids Research Institute

Dr. Michael Salter is Senior Scientist in the Neurosciences & Mental Health Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) Research Institute, and a professor at the University of Toronto. He holds the Canada Research Chair in Neuroplasticity and Pain, and is the Anne and Max Tanenbaum Chair in Molecular Medicines. He has authored more than 120 scientific papers, reviews and book chapters. Dr. Salter is best known for his work on synaptic physiology and he has done groundbreaking work that has led to new paradigms about neuroplasticity and about how synaptic transmission in the central nervous system is regulated by biochemical processes within neurons and by glial-neuronal interactions. His discoveries have broad implications for the control of cell-cell communication throughout the nervous system and his work has regularly appeared in elite journals including Nature, Science, Cell, Nature Medicine and Neuron. Notwithstanding his present focus on molecular/cellular aspects of pain he has published work on many aspects of the pain experience including clinical studies on bio-behavioural aspects of chronic pain in patients. Dr. Salter received an MD degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1982 and went on to obtain a PhD in Physiology from McGill in 1987. After post-doctoral training at Toronto Western and Mt. Sinai hospitals he joined the Research Institute at SickKids in 1990, with an academic appointment in the Department of Physiology at the University of Toronto. He moved rapidly through the ranks and is currently Head of the Neurosciences & Mental Health Program and Associate Chief, Science Strategy at SickKids, and a Professor of Physiology, IMS and Dentistry at UofT. Dr. Salter was the founding Director of the University of Toronto Centre for the Study of Pain an initiative which spans the Faculties of Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry and Pharmacy. In the Centre, he brought together a diverse group of more than 60 pain researchers and academics in the University of Toronto community. Dr. Salter is also a founder and Vice-President of NoNO Inc. a biotechnology company based in Toronto that is developing novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of stroke, neurodegeneration, neurotrauma and pain by targeting protein-protein interactions within neurons in the brain and spinal cord.

Benjamin Greenberg, MD
Associate Professor Cain Denius Scholar in Mobility Disorders, Department of Neurology & Neurotherapeutics, Pediatrics, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Dr. Benjamin Greenberg received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Johns Hopkins University and his Masters Degree in Molecular Microbiology and Immunology from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended medical school at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Then, he completed an internship in medicine at Rush Presbyterian-St. Luke?s Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois before going on to his residency in neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD. He then joined the faculty within the division of neuroimmunology at Hopkins and became the co-director of the Transverse Myelitis Center and director of the Encephalitis Center. In January of 2009 he was recruited to the faculty at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center where he was named Deputy Director of the Multiple Sclerosis Program and Director of the new Transverse Myelitis and Neuromyelitis Optica Program. His research interests are in both the diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis, neuromyelitis optica and infections of the nervous system. He is actively involved in developing better ways to diagnose and prognosticate for patients with these disorders. He has led an effort to improve biorepository development and has created uniform protocols for sample handling and analysis. As part of this initiative his research has identified novel biomarkers that may be able to distinguish between patients with various neurologic disorders. He also coordinates trials that study new treatments to prevent neurologic damage and restore function to those who have already been affected.

Ari Green, MD
Director of UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center, Director of UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center, Rachleff Endowed Professor, Associate Professor of Neurology and Opthalmology, UCSF School of Medicine

Dr. Ari J. Green is Clinical Director of the UCSF Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Center and director of the UCSF Neurodiagnostics Center. He treats adults and children with MS and other inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system and has expertise in treating visual problems resulting from these conditions. In his research, he addresses how MS affects the visual system and methods to track and predict the course of the disease. He also uses advanced retinal imaging and electrophysiology to investigate the retina and optic nerve and the relationships between inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in the disease and to better understand injury to nerve fibers of the brain in MS.

Green earned a medical degree at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and completed an internal medicine internship in 2002 and neurology residency in 2005, both at UCSF. In 2005, he was chief resident at UCSF. He completed neuro-immunology and neuro-ophthalmology fellowships at UCSF and has won several awards including a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist Award and a clinician-scientist award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and American Academy of Neurology Foundation. Green is an associate professor of Neurology and Opthalmology at UCSF.

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, PhD, MPH
Assistant Adjunct Professor of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud is a former student of the Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon in France. After receiving an M.P.H. from University Paris XIII in 2002, he got his Ph.D. in Immunogenetic Epidemiology and Public Health from Toulouse University in 2005. He relocated to the United States to do his postdoctoral research in Neuroimmunogenetics of multiple sclerosis at UCSF in 2009 and joined the UCSF faculty in 2011. Dr Gourraud has established numerous research collaborations with investigators from all over the world: He develops bioinformatics resources at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (Immunogenetics markers: HLA, KIR, Microsatellites). At UCSF, he performs new generation of MS genetic association studies using massive sequencing technologies in various genetic ancestry backgrounds and continues developing software dedicated to translational digital medicine. His recent efforts have focused on the MS Bioscreen, a tablet-based navigation-system that integrates multiple dimensions of patient information including clinical evolution, therapeutic treatments, brain imaging, genomics and biomarker data.

Susan Catalano, PhD
Founder and Chief Science Officer, Cognition Therapeutics, Inc.

Dr. Susan Catalano received her B.A. from Barnard College and Ph.D. from U.C. Irvine. She completed her postdoctoral training at U.C. Berkeley and Caltech in the field of neurobiology. While a scientist at Roche Palo Alto, she led the Neurophysiology and Neuroimaging groups along with anexploratory program in psychiatric disorders. After Roche, Dr. Catalano joined Rigel Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and led the team that discovered the Aurora kinase inhibitor R763, (licensed to Serono for $135M in 2005.) Dr. Catalano founded a successful consulting practice, Drug Discovery Imaging, and then served as Director of Discovery Biology for Acumen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Dr. Catalano founded Cognition Therapeutics Inc (www.cogrx.com) in 2007 to discover and develop drugs to treat and prevent Alzheimers disease and currently serves as its Chief Science Officer. The company is currently advancing its candidate drugs towards the clinic. She also volunteers as the Executive Scientific Director of Pittsburgh-based nonprofit the Clear Thoughts Foundation and holds an adjunct appointment at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Radosveta Koldamova, MD, PhD
Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh

Radosveta (Rada) Koldamova, MD, PhD is Associate Professor at the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Dr. Koldamova research has been distinguished by groundbreaking findings in the area of Nuclear Receptor biology in brain and their targets, relevant to AD pathogenesis and therapy. Prior to her appointment at Pitt in 1995, Dr. Koldamova served as a General Practitioner and an Instructor and Lecturer in Biochemistry at the School of Medicine, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria. She defended her PhD thesis in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. From 1995 to 2005, she was a postdoctoral fellow and then Assistant Professor at the Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine University of Pittsburgh. While at Pharmacology, Dr. Koldamova discovered the role of cholesterol transporter ABCA1 and its transcriptional regulators LXR/RXR in AD using in vitro and in vivo model systems. The original reports published by Dr. Koldamova on biology of brain LXR, ABCA1 and therapeutic approaches for AD based on ligand activated NR established a new and fruitful area of AD research. Dr. Koldamova has served on numerous academic, scientific, and professional committees. She is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, International Society to Advance Alzheimer Research and Treatment, and American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and is a Principal Investigator on Federal Agencies and Private foundations funded grant awards.

Ahmad Salehi, MD, PhD
Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School

Ahmad Salehi, M.D., Ph.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School and the Director of the Translational Laboratory at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California. He obtained his MD in Tehran, Iran and then moved to the Netherlands Institute for Brain Research, in Amsterdam to get his PhD. While he was there, he was selected as the best junior scientist in the field of Alzheimers disease in the Netherlands. After finishing his graduate studies and 3 years of postdoc in Amsterdam, he moved to Stanford Medical School. First as a postdoc, and then as a Senior Research Associate, he worked on mechanisms of failed axonal transport in mouse models of Down syndrome. For almost a decade, he was the Director of Stanford Brain Bank. Since 2009, Dr. Salehi has moved to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. In December 2010, he received the World Technology Award in the field of Biotechnology for his innovative work on the use of mouse models of Down syndrome. During his carrier, Ahmad has been involved in publication of a large number of papers from which several have appeared on the cover of Science, Cell: Stem Cell, Science Translational Medicine, Neuroscience and Bio-behavior Reviews, and Biological Psychiatry (twice).

Bryan L. Roth, MD, PhD
Director, NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program, Michael Hooker Chair Protein Therapeutics , Professor of Pharmacology, UNC Chapel Hill Medical School Chapel Hill

ryan L. Roth MD, PhD is the Michael Hooker Distinguished Professor of Protein Therapeutics and Translational Proteomics in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Medical School. Dr. Roth has published more than 300 papers and has given more than 200 invited talks. Dr. Roth has served on the editorial boards of many major scientific journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular Pharmacology, the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, The Journal of Receptors and Signal Transduction Research, the Journal of Neurochemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Psychopharmacology and Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr Roth is currently Associate Editor for the Journal of Clinical Investiagation. Dr. Roth is also a member of Faculty of 1000. Dr. Roth has received a number of honors including the PhRMA Foundation Excellence in Pharmacology Award, the Irving Page Lecture, the NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award, the Heffter Foundation Award for Basic Science Research, the Lowenthal Lecture (Medical College of Virginia), a Prestige Lecture (Universit de Montral), the SG Fergusson Memorial Lecture (Robarts Institute), the Chauncy Leake Memorial Lecture (Univ Texas Medical Branch), the National Institute of Mental Health Career Development Award, a Dana Foundation Fellowship in Neurosciences (Stanford University) and Phi Beta Kappa (St. Louis University). Dr. Roths work has been highlighted and Dr. Roth has been interviewed about his work in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radios All Things Considered, CBS Early Program, MSNBC, the Los Angeles Times and a large number of other media outlets.

Stephanie Willerth, PhD
Assistant Professor, University of Victoria Engineering, Canada

Dr. Willerth currently holds a Canada Research Chair in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Victoria where she is dually appointed in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Division of Medical Sciences. Her research group investigates how to engineer neural tissue by combining pluripotent stem cells, controlled drug delivery and biomaterial scaffolds . She has given invited talks at the Till and McCulloch Annual Meeting and at the 1st Annual British Columbia Stem Cell and Regeneration Medicine Initiative Meeting as well as presented at the 9th Annual World Biomaterials Congress in Chengdu, China. She belongs to both the Brain Research Centre (BRC) and the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) - B.C. based organizations committed to treating brain diseases and disorders and finding long term treatments for the repair of spinal cord injuries respectively. Before accepting her faculty position, Dr. Willerth completed an NIH post doctoral fellowship at the University of California-Berkeley and graduate studies at Washington University.

Peter Glick, PhD
Henry Merritt Wriston Professor of the Social Sciences, Professor of Psychology, Lawrence University

Peter Glick is a Professor of Psychology at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. He received his A.B. in psychology from Oberlin College in 1979 and his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Minnesota in 1984. Glick and frequent collaborator Susan T. Fiske received the 1995 Gordon Allport Intergroup Relations Prize, honoring the "best paper or article of the year on intergroup relations" for "The Ambivalent Sexism Inventory: Differentiating Hostile and Benevolent Sexism." Research interests: how the structure of intergroup relations affects prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination; and how subjectively positive stereotypes (e.g., women are warm and nurturing, Jews are clever) can nevertheless feed into discrimination (e.g., paternalistic prejudice toward women, envious prejudice toward Jews).

David N. Kennedy, PhD
Professor, Univ of Massachusettes Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, Director of the Division of Neuroinformatics at the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative

Dr. Kennedy is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He is Director of the Division of Neuroinformatics at the Child and Adolescent Neurodevelopment Initiative (CANDI). He has extensive expertise in the development of image analysis techniques and was a co-founder of the Center for Morphometric Analysis (CMA) at the Massachusetts General Hospital. His career has seen participation in the advent of such technologies as MRI-based morphometric analysis (1989), functional MRI (1991) and diffusion tensor pathway analysis (1998). He has long standing experience with development of neuroinformatics resources (Internet Brain Volumetric Database, Internet Brain Segmentation Repository, Internet Analysis Tools Registry), and participated as co-PI (PI: Bruce Rosen) of the morphometry Biomedical Informatics Research Network (mBIRN). Dr. Kennedy is the community liaison for the Neuroimaging Informatics Tools and Resources Clearinghouse (NITRC). In addition, he is a founding editor of the journal Neuroinformatics that debuted in 2003.

Neuroscience

Sponsors & Partners

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LI-COR first introduced scientific instruments for plant science research and quickly grew to provide scientists tools for such diverse disciplines as atmospheric research and the study of how proteins interact at the cellular level. LI-COR Biosciences is a global leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of high quality, innovative instruments, software, reagents, and integrated systems for plant biology, biotechnology, drug discovery, and environmental research.

QIAGEN N.V., a Netherlands holding company, is the leading global provider of Sample & Assay Technologies that are used to transform biological materials into valuable molecular information. Sample technologies are used to isolate and process DNA, RNA and proteins from biological samples such as blood or tissue. Assay technologies are then used to make these isolated biomolecules visible and ready for interpretation. QIAGEN markets more than 500 products around the world, selling both consumable kits and automation systems to customers through four customer classes: Molecular Diagnostics (human healthcare), Applied Testing (forensics, veterinary testing and food safety), Pharma (pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies) and Academia (life sciences research).

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Since its inception in 1994, Zymo Research has been proudly serving the scientific community by providing innovative, high quality research tools at affordable prices. Our vision The Beauty of Science is to Make Things Simple is now truer than ever. Whether it's Epigenetics, DNA, RNA, E. coli, or Yeast based research, our philosophy remains the same: to provide the highest quality products in the industry while ensuring they are both simple to use and reliable in their performance.

It all started in 1984 in Ed Ulmans kitchen where he made his first diet for lab animal research. Ed had spent many years in the research community and saw a need for a reliable source for custom purified diets. With his contacts in the industry and first hand knowledge of lab animal research he has built Research Diets into a flourishing business.

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The combination and synergy of OpenSource Diets and the BioDAQ food and liquid intake monitor, has placed Research Diets, Inc. on the forefront of the study of dietary effects on phenotype expression. What we like to call NutriPhenomics.

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Acris GmbH was founded 1998 as a spinoff of DPC Biermann GmbH, the German subsidiary of Diagnostic Products Corp., Los Angeles. Acris took over responsibility for marketing the DPC Biermann research products. From 1999 to 2003 Acris GmbH focused more and more on the research antibodies.

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For the past ten years, ATS has primarily focused on the development and sale of products for the Neuroscience research community. The Company's current product line includes targeted toxins, antibodies and custom services designed to assist neuroscientists in the study of nervous system function, brain-related diseases and disorders.

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The ADDF is committed to investing in a diverse portfolio of research programs and strengthening our network of partnerships until we discover a cure. The ADDF focuses its funding entirely on preclinical research and early-stage clinical trials involving new drug targets that hold great promise but may not be far enough along in the drug development pipeline to receive financial support from the pharmaceutical industry or other partners. The ADDF bridges this critical gap in funding between basic research and drug development, enabling the scientific pursuit of many innovative and novel therapies that might otherwise go unexplored.

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Neuroscience

Program Committee

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Alan Wright, MD

Dr. Wright is the Chief Medical Officer at Roche Diagnostics Corporation in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Prior to joining Roche, Dr. Wright served as Senior Vice President of Health Improvement Strategies for Miraca Life Sciences.   He was the Vice President for Product Strategy and Business Development for Resolution Health, a privately held analytics and intervention company serving the managed care market place.  Until 2005, Dr. Wright was chairman and CEO of Star Pharmaceuticals, a generic pharmaceutical company he founded in 2002, serving the needs of the urological community.  Previously, he was Senior Vice President and Chief Science Officer of Caremark .  Dr. Wright also served as Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for AdvancePCS. 

Dr. Wright graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from Pennsylvania State University.  He received his medical doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania and completed his residency in internal medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia.  While at Temple he served as Chief Medical Resident from 1985 to 1986 and completed his Masters of Public Health degree at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.  Dr. Wright is a member of several journal editorial boards.  He is a member of the American Medical Association and American College of Physicians.  He is also certified as a diplomat to the American Board of Internal Medicine and the National Board of Medical Examiners.

Vincent Mauro, Ph.D.

Dr. Mauro is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. He is also a co-founder and lead scientist of Promosome, a biotechnology company focused on bioproduction enablement and DNA vaccines. In addition, Dr. Mauro is a Senior Fellow in Experimental Neurobiology at the Neurosciences Institute in San Diego, California.

Prior to moving to The Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Mauro received his Ph.D. at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, and continued his studies as a postdoctoral fellow at The Rockefeller University in New York City. 

Dr. Mauro studies both fundamental and applied aspects of translational control mechanisms. His basic research is focused on understanding how eukaryotic mRNAs recruit ribosomes, how ribosomes subsequently locate initiation codons, and how ribosomes regulate the translation of specific subsets of mRNAs. Dr. Mauro's applied studies build on his basic research. These applied studies have led to the identification of Translational Enhancer Elements (TEEs) and the generation of synthetic translational enhancers.

Mark Marzinke, PhD, BABCC

Mark Marzinke, PhD, DABCC earned a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and subsequently completed a clinical chemistry fellowship at The Johns Hopkins University in 2012. During his clinical fellowship, Dr. Marzinke focused on the development and validation of qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometric assays for the clinical monitoring and quantitation of pain management drugs and anti-neoplastic agents, respectively. Further, he performed large scale proteomics studies aimed at the temporal identification of biomarkers expressed during ovarian cancer progression. Dr. Marzinke is currently an Instructor in the Departments of Pathology and Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (JHUSOM).  He serves as the Director of Preanalytics and General Chemistry in the Core Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he focuses on workflow analysis and test utilization.  Additionally, he is the Associate Director of the Clinical Pharmacology Analytical Lab (CPAL) at the JHUSOM, where he focuses on the development and validation of quantitative mass spectrometric methods in rare matrices to support large clinical trials.   His research interests include the development, validation and implementation of assays focused on personalized medicine, including therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic testing.  Dr. Marzinke is board certified by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry.

Alan Maisel, MD

Dr. Alan Maisel  attended University of Michigan Medical School and did his cardiology training at the University of California at San Diego.  He is currently Professor of Medicine at the University and director of the coronary care unit and the heart failure program at the affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He is considered one of the worlds experts on cardiac biomarkers, and is given credit for ushering in the use of BNP levels in clinical practice around the world. He has over 300 articles in print and a large clinical and basic science lab.  Dr. Maisel is also a fixture at the medical school, where he has won countless teaching awards from medical students as well as interns and residents. Dr Maisel s yearly San Diego Biomarker meeting is considered the most prestigious of its kind. Dr. Maisel is currently an Associate Editor of the Journal of American College of Cardiology.  He has published two medical novel and helps to raise five children,  He gave up on sleep five years ago.

Ariel Louwrier Ph.D.

Dr. Louwrier has successfully brought strategic vision coupled with tactical operational success to positions he has been employed at throughout his career. He is an entrepreneur with a broad range of experience in a variety of scientific fields as well as excelling in executive management in the biotechnology industry. Growing up in Europe gained him the sound knowledge of multiple languages after which he moved to the UK for his undergraduate work at the University of Sussex, specializing in genetics and heat shock. This was followed by doing his PhD in Biochemistry and Biotransformations at the University of Kent at Canterbury, also in the UK. He worked in conjunction with SmithKline Beecham (now GSK) resulting in biosynthetic methods of amoxicillin production that have since been integrated into current manufacturing processes.  Ariel then went on to work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the field of non-aqueous enzymology and protein engineering in the Chemical Engineering Department. Later, returning to the UK he joined ABgene (now a Thermo Fisher portfolio company), in 1995. Shortly thereafter Ariel started StressMarq Biosciences Inc., a new reagent cellular-stress company, which continues to provide researchers worldwide with the highest quality heat shock and cellular stress reagents.

C Jimmy Lin, MD, PhD, MHS

Jimmy Lin, MD, PhD, MHS, is a 2012 TED Fellow and Founder & President of Rare Genomics Institute, the world's first platform to enable any community to leverage cutting-edge biotechnology to advance understanding of any rare disease. Partnering with 18 of the top medical institutions, such as Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins, and Stanford, RGI helps custom design personalized research projects for diseases so rare that no organization exists to help. Dr. Lin is also a medical school faculty member at the Washington University in St. Louis and led the computational analysis of the first ever exome sequenching studies for any human disease at Johns Hopkins. He has numerous publications in Science, Nature, Cell, Nature Genetics, and Nature Biotechnology, and has been featured in Forbes, Bloomberg, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and the Huffington Post.

Agnieszka Lichanzka Ph.D.

Agnieszka is currently a Staff Scientist and Laboratory Manager at TessArae, LLC in Sterling, VA, USA. She obtained her PhD at the University of Queensland in Australia in a field of biochemistry, and subsequently worked as a post-doctoral fellow at Queen's University of Belfast, University of Queensland and Institute for Molecular Biosciences. Since 2005 until 2008 she held a continuing appointment as a lecturer in a School of Dentistry at the University of Queensland and established her own laboratory in area of functional genomics and metabonomics. She has over 10 years of experience in molecular biology, genetics, genomics, biochemistry, microbiology and metabonomics. In addition she has experience as a science writer. Recently Agnieszka served on the Council of the Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and is still active in the society. Currently she is working on novel diagnostic assays for infectious diseases using microarray re-sequencing technology.

Martin Latterich, PhD

Dr. Latterich has nearly 20 years of academic and commercial and leadership experience and features an accomplished research career focused on the proteomics-based discovery of novel biomarkers in oncology, respiratory disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

Martin is currently CSO at BioScale, a Lexington, MA, based biotechnology corporation commercializing a novel acoustic biomarker quantification platform. Most recently Martin served as a Professor at the Proteogenomics Research Institute for Systems Medicine in San Diego, where his laboratory used proteomics and genomics to discover novel biomarkers of cancer and degenerative disease though a systems biology approach that includes proteomics. He is also the CSO, co-founder and a board member for the non-profit Nicholas Conor Institute for Pediatric Cancer Research. Martin's work at the institute included designing new technologies to enable the better treatment of children with cancer, using personalized medicine technology to match their unique genetic make-up and tumor physiology to available treatment options. He previously served on the faculty of the University of Montreal, McGill University and the Salk Institute. His grant-funded work has been recognized by the 2003 Tier I Canada Research Chair, the 1998 Pew Scholar Award and the 1997 Basil O'Connor Starter Scholar Award.

Dr. Latterich also held senior management positions at several biotechnology companies, including Diversa and Illumina, where he headed the proteomics initiatives. He has made significant contributions to the field of cell biology, clinical biomarker discovery, proteomics and genomics. Among his recent discoveries are biomarkers for cancer, respiratory disease and neurodegenerative disorders. Dr Latterich has edited one book on RNAi, is author on over 34 publications in leading scientific journals and is listed on numerous patent applications. Martin is Editor-in-Chief of the scientific journal Proteome Science. He has served on several national and international study sections. He was a postdoctoral fellow in molecular and cell biology in the laboratory of Dr. Randy Schekman at the HHMI and University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Latterich earned his Ph.D. in cell biology and a B.Sc. in biochemistry and molecular biology from Durham University, U.K.

Fred Russell Kramer, PhD

Fred Russell Kramer is Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at the New Jersey Medical School, and has been a Principal Investigator at the Public Health Research Institute for the past 25 years. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1964 and received his doctorate from the Rockefeller University in 1969. He was on the faculty of the Department of Genetics and Development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons for 17 years and has been a Research Professor and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Microbiology at New York University School of Medicine for the past 24 years.

Kamisha Johnson-Davis, PhD, DABCC, FACB

Dr. Johnson-Davis is a medical director of the Clinical Toxicology laboratory, Antifungal Testing and Immunosuppressants Testing at ARUP. Dr. Johnson-Davis received her PhD in pharmacology at the University of Utah and is board certified in clinical chemistry by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship in clinical chemistry at the University of Utah, Department of Pathology, and was a postdoctoral research associate at the Center of Human Toxicology at the University of Utah. Dr. Johnson-Davis is a member of various professional societies, including the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

Daniel Irimia, MD, PhD

Dr. Irimia is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children in Boston, and Harvard Medical School.  He is leading a research program that is focused on studying the roles of cellular migration in health and disease.  Dr. Irimia is interested in probing the role of cancer cell migration during cancer invasion and tumor metastasis.  He is also very interested in understanding how the ability of white blood cells to move and protect against microbes is being affected during the systemic inflammation responses after burn and trauma injuries.  For this research, he is employing the most advanced microscale technologies which enable us to design new tools and measure cell migration with better precision than ever before.

Ross J Molinaro, PhD, MT(ASCP), DABCC, FACB

Ross J. Molinaro, PhD, MT(ASCP), DABCC, FACB is an Assistant Professor

in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Emory

University. He received his PhD in Clinical Chemistry and Molecular

Medicine from Cleveland State University and completed the ComACC

training program at Emory as the first recipient of the AACC

Past-Presidents’ Scholarship. He currently serves as the Medical

Director of the Core Laboratory at Emory University Hospital Midtown and

co-Director of the Emory Clinical Translational Research Laboratory.

Ross also teaches various aspects of laboratory medicine to medical

students, pathology residents and fellows, clinical chemistry fellows,

and medical technology students.

Ross joined the AACC in 2005 and is a member of the Proteomics and

Clinical Translational Science Divisions. Ross is currently a committee

member of the Society for Young Clinical Laboratorians (SYCL). He is

also a member of the Professional Practice Review Course Curriculum

Organizing Committee and the Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council

Executive Committee as the Exam Questions Vault Coordinator. In

addition, Ross serves as an American Society for Clinical Pathology

(ASCP) Board Liaison to the Clinical Chemistry Examination Committee,

and a member of the Board of Governors as the ASCP/AACC Member

Representative. With over 40 publications and book chapters, his

interests reside in the practice and standardization of mass

spectrometry in the clinical laboratory and expanding the knowledge base

of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine for medical students and

those practicing in different healthcare disciplines.

Howard Morris, PhD, FAACB, FFSc(RCPA)

Professor Howard Morris is Professor of Medical Sciences at the University of South Australia and a Chief Medical Scientist in Chemical Pathology at SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia.

He is currently Vice-President of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) and Chair of the IFCC-International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group on Standardization of Bone Marker Assays. He has over 30 years experience in Clinical Biochemistry largely managing the Endocrinology laboratory of a large public pathology service. Between 2003 and 2009 he was the Director of the Hanson Institute in Adelaide, the major medical research institute in South Australia. His research investigates the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and the effects of hormones including vitamin D and dietary calcium. He was the Louis Avioli Memorial Lecturer at the 2009 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. He is also Chair of the South Australian Department of Health Working Party on Osteoporosis and Fracture Prevention.

Judd Moul, MD, FACS

Dr Judd W. Moul is James H. Semans, MD Professor of Surgery, Division of Urologic Surgery, and Director of the Duke Prostate Center, Duke Cancer Institute at Duke University Medical Center.  Prior to joining Duke, he was Professor of Surgery at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in Bethesda, Maryland and an attending Urologic Oncologist at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) in Washington, DC.  In addition, he was Director of the Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR); a Congress-mandated research program of the Department of Defense based at USUHS and WRAMC.  In 2004, he completed a 26-year U.S. Army career, retiring as a full Colonel in the Medical Corps, and became Chief of the Division of Urologic Surgery at Duke.  Serving as Chief from 2004 to 2011, he brought innovation and growth to the program.  Most notably, he started the Duke Prostate Center, expanded the urology residency training program through a novel collaboration with the Department of Defense and was able to maintain Duke Urology as a top 10 program in the nation throughout his tenure.

Dr Moul completed his Urologic Oncology Fellowship at Duke University and graduated Summa Cum Laude from Pennsylvania State University.  He earned his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Omega Alpha.

Dr Moul currently serves on the editorial boards of Prostate Cancer, Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, BJU International, American Journal of Mens Health, Brazilian Journal of Urology, World Journal of Urology, and Oncology REALTIME.  He has published over 500 medical and scientific manuscripts and book chapters and has lectured at national and international meetings.  He has appeared on ABC, NBC, CNN, PBS, and other media as a prostate cancer authority.  Honors and awards received have included the American Medical Associations Young Physicians Section Community Service Award for his national involvement in prostate cancer patient support groups, the Sir Henry Welcome Research Medal and Prize from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, the prestigious Gold Cystoscope Award by the American Urological Association, the Baron Dominique Jean Larrey Military Surgeon Award for Excellence, the Order of Military Medical Merit from the Surgeon General at the US Army, and the Castle Connolly National Physician of the Year award.

Kathryn Wellen, PhD

Dr. Kathryn Wellen received a PhD from Harvard University in 2006 and performed postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania from 2006-2011.  In 2011 she joined the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Pennsylvania as an Assistant Professor.  She is a 2012 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences and is a recipient of a 2012 Forbeck Scholar Award.  Her laboratorys research focuses on elucidating links between cellular metabolism and signaling, with a current emphasis on metabolic regulation of the epigenome.

Sihe Wang, PhD DABCC FACB

Dr. Sihe Wang is Section Head and Medical Director of Clinical Biochemistry and Director of Clinical Biochemistry Fellowship Training Program, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.  He also chairs the clinical chemistry integration effort for the Cleveland Clinic Health System which includes 1 Florida hospital, 8 community hospitals and 18 family health centers in Northeast Ohio. Additionally, he is Clinical Chemistry Professor, Cleveland State University.  Prior to his current position, Dr. Wang was Assistant Professor at Northwestern University; Director, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory and Referred Testing Laboratory, Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Wang is a diplomate of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry (DABCC) and a fellow of the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (FACB).

Dr. Wang is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Society for Mass Spectrometry and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC). He served as chair of AACC Northeast Ohio Section in 2008 and 2009 and the president of North American Chinese Clinical Chemistry Association (NACCCA) 2008-2009. Currently he serves as the historian for NACCCA, the treasurer for the Pediatric and Maternal Fetal Division of AACC, the delegate for AACC Northeast Ohio section, commissioner for The Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry (ComACC), and a member of AACC's Strategies Online Editorial Advisory Board. The AACC presented him with the 2005, 2008, and 2010 Clinical Chemist Recognition Award. He is also the recipient of the 2006 Lemuel J. Bowie Young Investigator Award for the Chicago Section of the AACC. Dr. Wang has authored over 140 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He also serves on several editorial boards of peer reviewed journals.

Theral Timpson

Theral is the host of Mendelspod, where he interviews thought leaders from around the life science community.  He's a regular blogger at Mendelspod and frequent speaker and emcee at life science conferences and related events.  Theral is an active mentor in Silicon Valley for those seeking careers in science and or media.  He's the President and owner of Theral Timpson Productions where he offers consulting for life science marketing, strategic planning, and conflict resolution.   Mr. Timpson has over 15 years experience establishing and growing companies in the life science industry, including President and Co-Founder of Consumer Genetics and Vice President of Marketing at Medax International.     He received training from the E. Goldratt Institute in Theory of Constraints and holds a B.A. degree in English Literature from the University of Utah.

Deanne Taylor, MS, PhD

Dr. Taylors background is in biophysics, bioinformatics, computational biology and structural biology with emphasis on human genetics and translational medicine. She obtained her Ph.D. in Biophysics from  the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Pfizer in Ann Arbor. She had worked in the pharmaceutical industry at EMD-Serono, transitioning into clinical and basic research by moving to Harvard School of Public Health and then to clinical research at RWJ/Rutgers.  She also served several years as the Program Director of the Graduate Program in Bioinformatics at Brandeis University, where she still occasionally teaches a course in Computational Systems Biology.

Her main areas of research are in the development of mathematical and computational methods to better understand biological variation and the genetic contribution to disease, coupling clinical information with high-dimensional biomedical data from next-gen sequencing, microarray, PCR, and proteomics experiments.  Some of her immediate research interests are in  development of methods to better classify effects of genetic variation within interacting systems through effects in gene function and contributions to disease, developing  mathematical genotype representations of variation in populations,  and using machine-learning techniques to build classifiers in  translational medicine research. Her  scientific contributions were acknowledged with the rest of the Divisions research team at the 2010 ASRM meeting when the REI division received the ASRM Prize Paper Award, where her contribution was in building databases, systems and validated methods for high-throughput genotype analyses .

Joely Straseski, PhD, MS, MT(ASCP), DABCC

Dr. Straseski is a medical director of endocrinology at ARUP Laboratories and an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. She received her PhD in pathology and laboratory medicine and a Master’s degree in bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she also served as a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Pathology. Dr. Straseski completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical chemistry at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, Maryland. She has previously been awarded the Past-President Scholarship by the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, as well as a Distinguished Abstract Award from the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry. Dr. Straseski is board certified in clinical chemistry by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry.

Amy K Saenger, PhD, DABCC, FACB

Dr. Amy Saenger is an Assistant Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Director of Cardiovascular Laboratory Medicine in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. She is the Director of the Clinical Chemistry Fellowship Program and is actively involved in training fellows, pathology residents, and allied laboratory health staff. She also serves as a Director on the Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry (ComACC) board and is an Associate Editor for the journal Clinical Chemistry. Dr. Saenger received her PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Minnesota. She completed her clinical chemistry fellowship training at the University of Washington and is board certified in clinical chemistry (DABCC). 

Her research has focused on cardiac biomarkers such as troponin and natriuretic peptides, as well as novel biomarkers for the detection of oxidative and cardiovascular stress, damage, and heart failure. Dr. Saenger has been honored with the AACC Outstanding Scientific Achievements by a Young Investigator Award, the NACB George Grannis Award for Excellence in Research and Scientific Publication, the Paul E. Strandjord Young Investigator Award from the Academy of Clinical Physicians and Scientists, the Strandjord/Clayson Award for Meritorious Research from the University of Washington, and the AACC Outstanding Speaker Award. She serves on several AACC committees including the Clinical Laboratory News board of editors, the Society for Young Clinical Laboratorians executive committee, and is currently past-chair of the AACC Midwest Section.

Andrea Rose, PhD, MBA

Andrea Rose, Ph.D., M.B.A. serves as Senior Clinical Support Consultant

for Roche Diagnostics.  Dr. Rose is a Clinical Biochemist and has served

in a variety of management positions throughout her career. 

Dr. Rose obtained her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of

Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky, and then completed  postdoctoral

fellowships in Clinical Biochemistry, and Developmental and Molecular

Neurobiology.  After her association with University Hospital and the

University of Louisville Department of Pathology, Dr. Rose accepted a

position with Boehringer Mannheim Corporation which was acquired by

Roche Diagnostics.  Dr. Rose also obtained a Masters in Business

Administration from Indiana Wesleyan University while working for

Roche. 

Dr. Rose has written the chapter on Glycated Hemoglobin for the past

two editions of Kaplan and Pesce’s Methods in Clinical Chemistry and

lectures extensively in the area of diabetes testing.   Other interests

and lecture topics in addition to diabetes are obesity, nutrition, assay

interferences and sources of preanalytical and analytical error.   Dr.

Rose continues to be active in several professional organizations

serving on boards and committees for the advancement of clinical

laboratory initiatives.

John Quackenbush, PhD

John Quackenbush received his PhD in 1990 in theoretical physics from UCLA working on string theory models. Following two years as a postdoctoral fellow in physics, Dr. Quackenbush applied for and received a Special Emphasis Research Career Award from the National Center for Human Genome Research to work on the Human Genome Project. He spent two years at the Salk Institute and two years at Stanford University working at the interface of genomics and computational biology. In 1997 he joined the faculty of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) where his focus began to shift to understanding what was encoded within the human genome. Since joining the faculties of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health in 2005, his work has focused on the use of genomic data to reconstruct the networks of genes that drive the development of diseases such as cancer and emphysema.

Cathy Owen

Cathy was formerly the CEO, President and Director of

Nanopoint, Inc. a biotechnology company that developed and marketed unique

cellular imaging systems for the life sciences market.

James H. Nichols, Ph.D., DABCC, FACB

Jim received his B.A. in General Biology/Premedicine from Revelle College, University of California at San Diego. He went on to complete a Master's and Doctorate in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  Dr. Nichols was a fellow in the Postdoctoral Training Program in Clinical Chemistry at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.  He is board certified in both Clinical Chemistry and Toxicological Chemistry by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry.  Dr. Nichols spent several years as Associate Director of Clinical Chemistry, Director of Point-of-Care Testing, and an Associate Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions prior to moving to Massachusetts. Baystate Health includes Franklin Medical Center, Mary Lane Hospital and Baystate Medical Center, a leading acute care center in New England. Dr. Nichols’ research interests span evidence-based medicine, information management, laboratory automation, point-of-care testing and toxicology.

Bruce Hollis, PhD

Bruce W. Hollis, Ph.D. received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Ohio State University and subsequently his Ph.D. from the University of Guelph in 1979. Dr. Hollis then completed an Endocrine Fellowship at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in 1982.  Dr. Hollis was then Appointed Assistant Professor of Nutrition at Case Western and remained there until 1986 when he moved to The Medical University of South Carolina where to he is Professor of Pediatrics, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He is also Director of Pediatric Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Hollis has studied vitamin D metabolism and nutrition for the past 35 years and has been an NIH grant recipient for the past 30 years. His current work focuses on the vitamin D requirements during pregnancy and lactation. Dr. Hollis has in excess of 200 peer reviewed articles in this area of investigation.

Michael Holick, MD, PhD

Michael F. Holick, Ph.D., M.D. is Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics; Director of the General Clinical Research Unit; and Director of the Bone Health Care Clinic and the Director of the Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical Center.

Dr. Holick has made numerous contributions to the field of the biochemistry, physiology, metabolism, and photobiology of vitamin D for human nutrition. Dr. Holick has established global recommendations advising sunlight exposure as an integral source of vitamin D.  He has helped increase awareness in the pediatric and medical communities regarding vitamin D deficiency pandemic, and its role in causing not only metabolic bone disease, and osteoporosis in adults, but increasing risk of children and adults developing common deadly cancers, schizophrenia, infectious diseases including TB and influenza, autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease. He also observed the pregnant women who were vitamin D deficient were at increased risk for preeclampsia and requiring a C-section.  He has written more than 300 pier reviewed articles, edited or wrote 12 books including The Vitamin D Solution and is the recipient of numerous awards including the Linus Pauling Prize in Human Nutrition.

Timothy Harris, PhD

Since June 2011, Dr. Harris has served as the Senior Vice President of Translational Medicine at Biogen Idec. Dr. Harris has served as the Director of the Advanced Technology Program at SAIC Frederick since 2007 and Chief Technology Officer for SAIC Frederick since 2008. Prior to holding these positions, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer of Novasite Pharmaceuticals Inc. from January 2005 to September 2006. Prior to that, he served as Chief Executive Officer for Structural GenomiX, Inc., a drug discovery and development company focused on innovative cancer therapeutics from 2003 to 2004 and as its President and Chief Executive Officer from 1999 to 2003. Dr. Harris started his career in biotechnology in 1981 as a group leader in Molecular Biology at Celltech Group and from 1989 to 1993 was Director of Biotechnology at Glaxo Group Research in the U.K. From 1993 until 1999, Dr. Harris was Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President of Research and Development at Sequana Therapeutics Inc. in San Diego, which became Axys Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in 1998 and was subsequently acquired by Celera Genomics. During the past five years, Dr. Harris has served on the board of directors of Dendreon Corporationration and he currently serves on the boards of directors of Origen Therapeutics, Inc. and Gyrasol Technologies and is Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of Bionomics Inc. in Australia.

Stephanie Willerth, PhD

Dr. Willerth currently holds a Canada Research Chair in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Victoria where she is dually appointed in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Division of Medical Sciences. Her research group investigates how to engineer neural tissue by combining pluripotent stem cells, controlled drug delivery and biomaterial scaffolds . She has given invited talks at the Till and McCulloch Annual Meeting and at the 1st Annual British Columbia Stem Cell and Regeneration Medicine Initiative Meeting as well as presented at the 9th Annual World Biomaterials Congress in Chengdu, China. She belongs to both the Brain Research Centre (BRC) and the International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD) - B.C. based organizations committed to treating brain diseases and disorders and finding long term treatments for the repair of spinal cord injuries respectively. Before accepting her faculty position, Dr. Willerth completed an NIH post doctoral fellowship  at the University of California-Berkeley and graduate studies at Washington University.

Katerina Venderova, PharmD, PhD

Dr. Katerina Venderova obtained her master's and doctorate degrees in pharmacy, and her PhD in Toxicology from Charles University in the Czech Republic. She then received a fellowship from the Parkinson Society Canada and pursued her postdoctoral training at Toronto Western Research Institute (2 years), and subsequently at University of Ottawa in Canada (5 years), where she studied genetics of Parkinson's disease, mechanisms of neuronal death and cell signaling in the basal ganglia. Dr. Venderova joined Pacific in 2011.

Ahmad Salehi, MD, PhD

Ahmad Salehi, M.D., Ph.D. is a Clinical Associate Professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford Medical School and the Director of the Translational Laboratory at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California. He obtained his MD in Tehran, Iran and then moved to the Netherlands Institute for Brain Research, in Amsterdam to get his PhD. While he was there, he was selected as the best junior scientist in the field of Alzheimers disease in the Netherlands. After finishing his graduate studies and 3 years of postdoc in Amsterdam, he moved to Stanford Medical School. First as a postdoc, and then as a Senior Research Associate, he worked on mechanisms of failed axonal transport in mouse models of Down syndrome. For almost a decade, he was the Director of Stanford Brain Bank. Since 2009, Dr. Salehi has moved to the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. In December 2010, he received the World Technology Award in the field of Biotechnology for his innovative work on the use of mouse models of Down syndrome. During his carrier, Ahmad has been involved in publication of a large number of papers from which several have appeared on the cover of Science, Cell: Stem Cell, Science Translational Medicine, Neuroscience and Bio-behavior Reviews, and Biological Psychiatry (twice).

Paul Mathews, PhD

Dr. Paul J. Mathews received his bachelors degree from the University of Oregon where he studied invertebrate behavioral plasticity in the lab of Dr. Nathan Tublitz. He received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Texas at Austin under the mentorship of Dr. Nace Golding. Dr. Mathews work focused on understanding how the biophysical properties of specific voltage-gated ion channels in an auditory brainstem nuclei contribute to their capacity to make sub-millisecond computations necessary for low frequency sound localization. For the past several years Dr. Mathews has been working at UCLA under the mentorship of Dr. Tom Otis where he is currently working to uncover the cerebellar circuit mechanisms that underlie motor learning and memory. To do this Dr. Mathews is utilizing a multifaceted approach that includes both in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology, optogenetics, advanced optics, histology, and behavioral manipulations to make links between cerebellar circuit activity and motor output in rodent models. He is currently on the job market looking for a tenured track assistant professor position.

Ulrich Hengst, PhD

Dr. Ulrich Hengst studied biochemistry at the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, and conducted his graduate research at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel, Switzerland, in the group of Prof. Denis Monard. In 2003 he received his PhD from the University of Basel. For his postdoctoral training, Dr. Hengst joined the laboratory of Samie R. Jaffrey, MD, PhD at the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY. In Dr. Jaffreys group, he investigated the role of axonally localized mRNAs for axonal development leading to the identification of the first examples of specific mRNAs that are translated in axons in response to extracellular signaling molecules and that mediate growth cone collapse and axon elongation, respectively.

In 2009, Dr. Hengst joined the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology and the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimers Disease and the Aging Brain at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, NY, as an Assistant Professor. He has successfully established new research projects addressing the role of local protein synthesis in Alzheimers disease and neurodevelopment.

Anthony Grace, PhD

Dr. Anthony A. Grace is a Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience and a

Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh

in Pittsburgh, PA.  He received his Ph.D. from Yale University School of

Medicine with Dr. Benjamin S. Bunney and had postdoctoral training with

Dr. Rodolfo Llinas in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at

New York University School of Medicine.  Dr. Grace has been involved in

translational research related to the dopamine system for over 30

years.   His early work pioneered the mode of action of antipsychotic

drugs, and the identification and characterization of

dopamine-containing neurons, and was the first to provide a means to

quantify their activity state and pattern in a way that is the standard

in the literature.  His current work involves novel treatments for

schizophrenia and its prevention, the role of dopamine in anhedonia and

affective disorders, and the mode of action of ketamine and novel

antidepressant drugs.  Dr. Grace has received several awards for his

research, including the Paul Janssen Schizophrenia Research Award and

the Lilly Basic Scientist Award from the International College of

Neuropsychopharmacology, the Efron Award from the American College of

Neuropsychopharmacology, as well as a NIMH MERIT award, a Distinguished

Investigator award from the National Alliance for Research in

Schizophrenia and Depression, the Judith Silver Memorial Investigator

Award from the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, a Fellow of the

American Association for the Advancement of Science, and appointment as a

Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at the University of

Pittsburgh.  He is also a past member of the governing council of the

American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and is on the editorial

board fornumerous leading journals in the field.

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud, PhD, MPH

Pierre-Antoine Gourraud is a former student of the Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon in France. After receiving an M.P.H. from University Paris XIII in 2002, he got his Ph.D. in Immunogenetic Epidemiology and Public Health from Toulouse University in 2005. He relocated to the United States to do his postdoctoral research in Neuroimmunogenetics of multiple sclerosis at UCSF in 2009 and joined the UCSF faculty in 2011. Dr Gourraud has established numerous research collaborations with investigators from all over the world: He develops bioinformatics resources at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (Immunogenetics markers: HLA, KIR, Microsatellites). At UCSF, he performs new generation of MS genetic association studies using massive sequencing technologies in various genetic ancestry backgrounds and continues developing software dedicated to translational digital medicine. His recent efforts have focused on the MS Bioscreen, a tablet-based navigation-system that integrates multiple dimensions of patient information including clinical evolution, therapeutic treatments, brain imaging, genomics and biomarker data.

Eric Gluck, MD, JD

Dr. Eric H. Gluck received his doctoral degree in medicine from New York Medical College in Valhalla, New York. He completed his residency at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Gluck currently serves as the director of Critical Care Services at Swedish Covenant Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, and as a professor of medicine at Finch University of Health Sciences at the Chicago Medical School. Dr. Gluck is a fellow of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, American College of Chest Physicians, and the Chicago Institute of Medicine. He is a member of the American Thoracic Society, Society of Sigma Xi, Alpha Omega Alpha, and the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. He has delivered numerous lectures and co-authored many articles in the field of pulmonary critical care.

Szczepan Baran, VMD, MS

Dr. Szczepan Baran is President and Chief Operating Officer of the Veterinary Bioscience Institute, which provides online surgical and biomethodology education to laboratory animal science and veterinary communities.  He also serves in the following capacities: Course Director at Drexel University College of Medicine for the online Masters of Laboratory Animal Science Program in Philadelphia; Adjunct Faculty in the Office of Research at Wake Forest University School of Medicine; and as a member of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute’s Document Development Committee.  Past experiences include: Chair and Co-chair on various laboratory animal science program committees; special volunteer position at the National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Genomic Diversity; and faculty at Delaware Valley College.

Dr. Baran earned a Master of Science degree from the University of Washington, a Veterinary Medical Doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science from the University of Delaware. His research interests include embryonic stem cells, the development and validation of online surgical training programs, and the development and validation of rodent laparoscopic procedures. Dr. Baran has established a freezing protocol for Nonhuman Primate Embryonic Stem cells, which has increased their survival from 5% to over 90%. Additionally, he was a contributing team member in the development of one of the first canine embryonic stem cell lines. He has pioneered new territory by demonstrating the effectiveness of online surgical training in the laboratory animal medicine field.

Ottavio Arancio MD, Ph.D

Dr. Ottavio Arancio received his Ph.D and M.D. from the University of Pisa (Italy).   From 1981 to 1986 he took residency training in Neurology at the University of Verona (Italy).  Dr. Arancio has held Faculty appointments at Columbia University, NYU School of Medicine and at SUNY HSCB.  In 2004 he became Faculty member of the Dept of Pathology & Cell biology and The Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain at Columbia University.  His honors include the “G. Moruzzi Fellowship” (Georgetown University), the “Anna Villa Rusconi Foundation Prize” (Italy), the “INSERM Poste vert Fellowship” (France), the AHAF centennial Award (2007), the Zenith Award (2007),  the Margaret Cahn Research Award (2008), and the Edward N. and Della L. Thome Memorial Foundation Award.

Dr Arancio is a cellular neurobiologist who has contributed to the characterization of the mechanisms of learning in both normal conditions and during neurodegenerative diseases.   During the last ten years he has pioneered the field of mechanisms of synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease.  Dr. Arancio’s laboratory has focused primarily on events triggered by amyloid protein.  These studies, which have suggested new links between synaptic dysfunction and amyloid protein, are of a general relevance to the field of Alzheimer’s disease both for understanding the etiopathogenesis of the disease and for developing therapies aiming to improve the cognitive symptoms. 

R. Claudio Aguilar, Ph.D.
Antonio Baines, Phd

Dr. Antonio T. Baines is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) and an adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmacology in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Chapel Hill. He earned a bachelors degree in biology from Norfolk State University and a doctorate in pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Arizona. Afterwards, Dr. Baines accepted a postdoctoral fellowship at UNC in pharmacology and radiation oncology under Drs. Channing Der and Adrienne Cox.  His research focused on understanding the role of the Ras oncogene as a molecular target in pancreatic cancer oncogenesis. In August 2006, Dr. Baines accepted a tenure-track faculty position at NCCU where he currently teaches and conducts research as a cancer biologist. Also, he mentors high school, undergraduate, and graduate students in his laboratory.

  

Pancreatic cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States with a high mortality rate and very limited treatment options. The overall focus of Dr. Baines research program is to identify and validate novel molecular targets in pancreatic cancer which can be targeted by potential cancer therapeutics.  Additionally, his lab aims to understand the role of these molecular targets in the development and progression of normal cells transforming into cancer cells of the pancreas. Currently, Dr Baines studies the functional significance of the oncogenic Pim kinase family in pancreatic cancer growth and development. He hypothesizes that inhibition of these enzymes will be an effective approach for antagonizing the aberrant growth of pancreatic carcinoma. In addition to working with colleagues in academia, he collaborates with various pharmaceutical companies that are developing Pim inhibitors. Results from his studies will allow for critical validation of these kinases as novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. Dr. Baines research has been funded by NIH and other grant sources. He has presented his research at various national scientific meetings such as the Society of Toxicology and the American Association for Cancer Research. In addition, Dr. Baines has given invited research seminars at universities such as Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical (A&T) State University, Indiana University, North Carolina State University, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Pinar Bayrak-Toydemir, MD, PhD

Dr. Bayrak-Toydemir is the medical director of the Molecular Genetics and Genomics Laboratories at ARUP and an associate professor of pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Bayrak-Toydemir received her MD from the Ankara University School of Medicine in Ankara, Turkey, where she also received her PhD in human genetics. Subsequently, she completed her fellowship in clinical molecular genetics at the University of Utah. She is board certified in medical genetics.

Dr. Bayrak-Toydemir has focused her research efforts on understanding the molecular genetic characteristics of the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) disease, an autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia. Her research aims to identify additional gene(s) that can cause HHT disease, to determine the roles of regulatory region mutations of known HHT genes, and to describe the genotype-phenotype correlation. In addition to HHT,  her research aims to identify gene(s) that cause various inherited vascular malformations.   She is also interested in application of next generation sequencing to molecular diagnostics.

Sharon Geaghan, MD

Dr. Geaghan is Chief, Pathology at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, and Co-Director of Clinical Laboratories at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. She also directs the Bass Pediatric Cancer Center Laboratory at the Lucile Packard Hospital; is Director of the Point of Care Testing Program for the women and children's hospital and is Director of Stanford Clinical Laboratory at Mary L. Johnson Pediatric Ambulatory Care Center. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and in Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine, teaching medical students, residents, fellows and post-graduate continuing medical education programs.

Dr. Geaghan received her undergraduate degree at Dartmouth College and MD at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her training, including two residencies in Anatomic and Surgical Pathology and in Laboratory Medicine, at the University of California, San Francisco, where she also served as Chief Resident and was the first Hematopathology Fellow. Dr. Geaghan holds four board certifications: in Anatomic Pathology; Hematopathology; Clinical Pathology and Pediatric Pathology.

Dr. Geaghan is Chair-elect of the American Association of Clinical Chemistry Division of Pediatric Maternal Fetal Division, the largest organization of laboratory medicine professionals (2012-2014). Dr. Geaghan was recently named to the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry's Task Force on Pediatric Laboratory Medicine, and the College of American Pathologists Point of Care Testing Committee.

Dr. Geaghan serves on numerous Executive Boards, including the Medical Executive Board at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford and also serves on Advisory Boards as an avid advocate for children's health, in various national Pediatric Clinical and Laboratory Medicine Associations. She has recently been named in Top Doctors of the Year by San Jose Magazine, and in the American Registry of Outstanding Professionals.

Wieslaw Furmaga, MD

Director, Clinical Chemistry Laboratory University Hospital

Director, General Laboratory Cancer Treatment Research Center

Director, Proteomics Laboratory UTHSC at San Antonio

Interim Director, Molecular Laboratory UTHSC at San Antonio

Associate Director, Mycology Laboratory UTHSC at San Antonio

I graduated from the Collegium Medicum at Jagiellonski University in

Poland, and subsequently completed residency program in anatomic,

clinical pathology and clinical chemistry. I have been practicing

pathology in the University of Texas Health Science Center at San

Antonio, Texas as a staff pathologist and medical director of clinical

chemistry and molecular laboratory.

I have been serving the Instrumental Resource Committee of the

College of American Pathologist (CAP) since 2008. Since 2009 I have

served for the Pharmacogenomics Committee, Educational subcommittee

working on Pharmacogenomics Educational Course. I was actively involved

in the CLSI on a project “Method Validation by using patient’s sample”.

The main scientific interest is in biomarkers for aggressive prostate

cancer as well as biomarkers for monitoring the trauma patients with

hemorrhagic shock.

George Fritsma, MS, MT

George Fritsma is an associate professor in Laboratory Medicine of the Department of Pathology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Prof. Fritsma manages www.fritsmafactor.com, “The Fritsma Factor, Your Interactive Hemostasis Resource,” a clinical coagulation educational resource and blog. The Fritsma Factor is sponsored by Precision BioLogic, Inc, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Prof. Fritsma is the continuing education editor for the Clinical Laboratory Science Journal and a member of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry publications committee. He is co-editor of Hematology Clinical Principles and Applications, 4th edition, 2012, and he is and co-author of Quick Guide to Renal Disease Testing, 2011; Quick Guide to Venipuncture, 2010; Quick Guide to Coagulation 2nd Edition, 2009; and Quick Guide to Hematology Testing, 2007, all available from the ASCLS bookstore.

Prof. Fritsma is a 40-year member of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science and a member of the International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and chemistry from Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan, a Masters in Medical Technology from Wayne State University, Detroit, and advanced course work from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

David Carpentieri, MD

Dr. Carpentieri is a Medical Staff Member at Large, Pathology, Phoenix Children's Hospital and is Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology and Pediatrics, University of Arizona and Assistant Professor of Pathology, Mayo Medical School.  His affiliations are with the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC), the Childrens Oncology Group (COG), Society for Pediatric Pathology (SPP), and the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER).

Charles Cantor, PhD

Dr. Charles Cantor is a founder, and Chief Scientific Officer at SEQUENOM, Inc., which is a genetics discovery company with tools, information and strategies for determining the medical impact of genes and genetic variations.

He is also the founder of SelectX Pharmaceuticals, a drug discovery company, Retrotope, an anti-aging company, and DiThera, a biotherapeutic company.

Dr. Cantor is professor emeritus of Biomedical Engineering and of Pharmacology and was the director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology at Boston University.  He is currently adjunct professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, adjunct professor of Molecular Biology at the Scripps Institute for Research, and distinguished adjunct professor of Physiology and Biophysics at UC Irvine. Prior to this, Dr. Cantor held positions in Chemistry and then in Genetics and Development at Columbia University and in Molecular Biology at the University of California at Berkeley. Cantor was educated in chemistry at Columbia College (AB) and at the University of California Berkeley (PhD).

Dr. Cantor has been granted more than 60 US patents and, with Paul Schimmel, wrote a three-volume textbook on biophysical chemistry. He also co-authored the first textbook on Genomics titled 'The Science and Technology of the Human Genome Project'.  In addition, he sits on the advisory boards of numerous national and international biotechnology firms, has published more than 450 peer-reviewed articles, and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

Cynthia Bowman MD

Dr. Cynthia Bowman has been a broad based general pathologist for over 30 years. She graduated with a BA in Chemistry from St. Olaf College, received her MD from Vanderbilt University Medical School, and trained for 6 years at the University of California, San Francisco as a surgery intern and then anatomic and clinical pathology resident. She worked as an emergency room physician during training and has always had a clinical perspective in her practices. She has worked in California, Maine, Massachusetts, New York and Australia as an anatomic and clinical pathologist and laboratory medical director in small, mid-sized, tertiary and academic  medical centers. She is currently Medical Director at Enzo Clinical Laboratories, a commercial reference laboratory and bioscience company in the NY metropolitan area, and in that capacity collaborates with the development and integration of molecular services into clinical testing.  She has been active in national laboratory organizations, especially the College of American Pathologists, where she was chair of the Point of Care Testing Resource Committee. In that capacity she guided the introduction and was the senior editor of a web-based POCT toolkit as a resource for laboratory director leadership in POCT.  She has also written and edited multiple educational pieces for the laboratory community as part of the CAP Excel Survey program and in 2012 she was awarded a Life Time Achievement Award by the CAP. She has spoken at AACC and CAP meetings and currently serves on several CLSI document development committees. She is currently chair of an International Federation of Clinical Chemistry POCT task force work group addressing the use of glucose  meters in critical care patients.  Her professional commitment has always been to integrate and translate pathology and laboratory medicine services into effective clinical care. She has dedicated her efforts in POCT as part of that vision to collaborate with all stakeholders and involve laboratory services as part of the continuum of care. She enjoys evaluating technology and integrating it into laboratory services.

Christoph H. Borchers, Ph.D.

Dr. Borchers received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Konstanz, Germany.  After his post-doctoral training and employment as a staff scientist at NIEHS/NIH/RTP, NC and he was the director of the Duke – UNC Proteomics Facility and held a faculty position at UNC Medical School in Chapel Hill, NC (2001-2006).  Since then Dr. Borchers is Associate Professor at University of Victoria (UVic), Canada and the Director of the UVic – Genome Proteomics Centre.  His research is centred around the improvement, development and application of proteomics technologies with major focus on techniques for quantitative targeted proteomics for clinical diagnostics.

Peter Blume-Jensen, MD, PhD

Dr. Peter Blume-Jensen has extensive expertise in basic and translational cancer research, oncogenic signaling, and targeted oncology therapeutics drug discovery prior to joining Metamark as CSO in 2010.  From 2001 to 2008 Peter was department head at first Serono, US and later at Merck Research Laboratories, Merck & Co, Inc. where he established novel, integrated oncology drug discovery departments and programs linking therapeutics to patient responder populations. Since 2008 he was Exec. Dir. and Vice President for External Scientific Affairs at Daiichi Sankyo Inc., served as the global 'Therapeutic Area Advisor' for Oncology, and was co-responsible for formulating a global oncology R&D strategy. He co-led the scientific M&A and due diligence resulting in the acquisition of Plexxikon (US$935M).  In 2010 he joined Metamark as CSO and 2nd employee.  Since June 2014, Peter has joined Xtuit Pharmaceuticals, a targeted therapeutics start-up, as CSO, and first employee.  Peter continues to serve as Chief Scientific Advisor and on the SAM for Metamark and also has joined the SAB of Veritas Gene, Inc, a NGS company.

Dr. Blume-Jensen has authored highly-cited original articles, reviews, and book chapters in Personalized Molecular Oncology. His review 'Oncogenic Kinase Signaling' in Nature is a citation classic in 'Clinical Medicine', and his work on genetically engineered cancer and male infertility mouse models has been widely portrayed on CNN and other news channels. His approaches for efficacy-predictive biomarkers have appeared on Nature Biotechnology's 'Hot patents' watch-list and in numerous Editorial highlights for Personalized Oncology. Dr. Blume-Jensen obtained his M.D. from Copenhagen, Denmark, his Ph.D. from Dr. Carl-Henrik Heldin's laboratory at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala, Sweden, and conducted his Post-Doctoral studies in Dr. Tony Hunter's laboratory at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA.

Josip Blonder, MD

Dr. Blonder is Head of the Clinical Proteomics Group, Laboratory of Proteomics & Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Cancer Research Technology Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. at NCIs, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL). In 1978, Dr. Blonder received his M.D. at the Rijeka University School of Medicine, Croatia. He completed a residency in emergency medicine in 1984 and assumed the position of head of Emergency Medicine, Medical Center Mostar. In 1989, he completed a fellowship in cardiology at the German Heart Institute in Berlin. In 2000, through Associated Western Universities, Dr. Blonder was awarded a post-doc fellowship in proteomics at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (Advisor: Dr. Richard D. Smith). During the stay with Dr. Smith, his research focused on proteome-wide analysis of membrane proteins using high-accuracy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. In 2002 at the PNNL, he developed a shotgun proteomic method for profiling membrane proteins that resulted in an offer to join Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. (formerly SAIC-Frederick Inc.), LPAT at NCI-Frederick. At the FNL, he extended the application of his method to global quantitative profiling of lipid raft and plasma membrane cell surface proteins resulting in significant discoveries subsequently confirmed in follow-up investigations using orthogonal molecular biology techniques [i.e., PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51356; J Immunol. 2013 Jul 15;191(2):892-901.]. In 2006, Dr. Blonder was appointed as the head of Clinical Proteomics, extending his research to technology development that would allow in vivo molecular profiling of clinical tissue specimens and body fluids to facilitate a better understanding of cancer biology and cancer biomarker development. His group was the first to optimize the immunodepletion of tissue homogenates in the context of tissue directed proteomics for cancer biomarker discovery. This effort resulted in the publication [i.e., Anal Chem. 2010; 82(5):1584-8.] of a method that relies on concomitant analysis of tissue and blood specimens to unambiguously detect genuine tumor proteins in the blood of a patient diagnosed with non-metastatic cancer for biomarker discovery. Dr. Blonder brings a unique combination of his expertise in medicine, clinical proteomics, and bioinformatics to cancer research where he promotes the use of qualitative/quantitative shotgun proteomics and systems biology to better understand cancer biology. He leads active translational research focused on developing and applying advanced proteomics to directly profile cell surface proteins, solid tumors and body fluids in the context of molecular discovery/phenotyping using systems biology and pathway analysis. He is a lecturer at the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences at NIH where he teaches a course on Clinical Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery. Since 2002, Dr. Blonder has authored over 50 scientific publications in areas of advanced mass spectrometry and clinical proteomics. He is an associate editor of BMC Cancer and a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

Joan W Bennett, PhD

Joan W. Bennett has been Professor II of Plant Biology and Pathology at Rutgers University since 2006. Prior to coming to Rutgers, she was on the faculty at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, for over thirty years. The Bennett laboratory studies the genetics and physiology of filamentous fungi. In addition to mycotoxins and secondary metabolites, the focus is on the volatile organic compounds emitted by fungi. These low molecular weight compounds are responsible for the familiar odors associated with the growth of molds and mushrooms. Some of them function as semiochemicals for insects while others serve as developmental signals for fungi. The Bennett lab has tested individual fungal VOCs in model systems, with the intent of providing a physiological basis for the hypothesis that volatile mold metabolites might be involved in “sick building syndrome.” For example, 1-octen-3-ol (“mushroom alcohol”) functions as a neurotoxin in Drosophila melanogaster and causes growth retardation in Arabidopsis thaliana. In other studies, we have demonstrated that living cultures of Trichoderma, a known biocontrol fungus, can enhance plant growth in the absence of physical contact between the plant and the fungus. In addition, we are investigating the potential use of fungi and their volatiles in bioenergy research. Dr. Bennett also has an active interest in fungal genomics and has been involved in genome projects for Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus and A. oryzae.

In addition to running a laboratory, Dr. Bennett is Associate Vice President for the Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (“SciWomen”), charged with promoting the welfare of women in science, engineering, mathematics and the health professions across the three campuses of Rutgers University at Camden, New Brunswick and Newark.

Tatjana Matejic, PhD, D(ABMLI)

Dr. Matejic is the founder of Biotech Expertise where she provides scientific and technical consulting services to biotech companies on development of functional assays reflective of mechanisms of drug action in the context of disease pathology, in vivo studies, and biomarkers.  She is an immunologist by training (Ph.D. in immunology, board certification in medical diagnostic immunology by the American Board of Medical Laboratory Immunology) with more than two decades of industrial experience working in research and development of Biotech/Pharma companies ranging from start-ups to multinational pharmaceutical corporations, Pfizer being the most recent one.  During her long career in industry she led and mentored diverse teams of scientists and contributed to all stages of project and product development from scientific idea to commercial product of diverse portfolio of biologics. She was recognized as a leader in development and implementation of strategies for evaluating biological function of therapeutic candidates. She contributed to efforts of interdisciplinary drug development teams to successfully advance numerous early and late stage clinical programs and a few commercial products across multiple therapeutic areas and disease targets. She also conducted technical diligence for transition of pipeline projects from discovery to development phase, as well as for technology assessment for in-licensing opportunities.

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